• Pakistan's Interior Minister, Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan addresses a news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Khan said authorities will perform DNA tests on the body of a man who was killed in an American drone strike to determine whether the slain man is actually Taliban chief Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour. Khan also condemned the drone strike, calling it a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

    Pakistan: DNA tests to confirm Taliban leaders death

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan’s Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said Tuesday that authorities will perform DNA tests on the body of a man who was killed in an American drone strike to determine whether the slain man is actually Taliban chief Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour.

    Updated: 10:01 am

  • A Pakistani police officer and paramedics stand beside two dead bodies reportedly killed in a U.S. drone strike in the Ahmad Wal area in Baluchistan province, Pakistan, at a hopsital in Quetta, Pakistan, Sunday, May 22, 2016. A senior commander of the Afghan Taliban confirmed on Sunday that the extremist group's leader, Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour, had been killed in the strike. (AP Photo/Arshad Butt)

    Senior Taliban figure says death of leader could unify group

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The death of the leader of the Afghan Taliban in a U.S. drone strike last week could make the insurgent movement stronger by bringing back dissident commanders and unifying the movement’s ranks, a senior Afghan Taliban figure said on Tuesday.

  • In this Tuesday, May 3, 2016 file photo, released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian citizens and firefighters gather at the scene where one of rockets hit the Dubeet hospital in the central neighborhood of Muhafaza in Aleppo, Syria. As one of the few pediatricians remaining in the Syrian city Aleppo, Dr. Mohammed Wassim Maaz was the last ray of hope for tens of thousands of children and their parents trapped in the horror and misery of the five-year civil war.  (SANA via AP, File)

    Hospitals a deadly target in Middle East conflicts

    BEIRUT (AP) — As one of the few pediatricians remaining in the Syrian city of Aleppo, Dr. Mohammed Wassim Maaz offered hope to tens of thousands of children and their parents trapped in the horror and misery of the five-year civil war. But last month, an airstrike widely believed to have been carried out by the Syrian government destroyed the al Quds hospital where he worked, killing Maaz and dozens of colleagues, patients and other civilians.

  • This photo taken by a freelance photographer Abdul Salam Khan using his smart phone on Sunday, May 22, 2016, purports to show the destroyed vehicle in which  Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour was traveling in the Ahmad Wal area in Baluchistan province of Pakistan, near Afghanistan's border. A senior commander of the Afghan Taliban confirmed on Sunday that the extremist group's leader,  Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour, has been killed in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photo/Abdul Salam Khan)

    Obama: Taliban leader’s death a ‘milestone’ for Afghan peace

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — President Barack Obama said Monday that the violent death of Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour by a U.S. airstrike should send a “clear signal” to anti-American extremists that “we’re going to protect our people.”

  • This photo taken by a freelance photographer Abdul Salam Khan using his smart phone on Sunday, May 22, 2016, purports to show the destroyed vehicle in which  Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour was traveling in the Ahmad Wal area in Baluchistan province of Pakistan, near Afghanistan's border. A senior commander of the Afghan Taliban confirmed on Sunday that the extremist group's leader,  Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour, has been killed in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photo/Abdul Salam Khan)

    The Latest: Kerry praises killing of Taliban leader

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Latest on the killing of Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour in a drone strike (all times local):

  • In this Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015 file photo, shows Taliban leader Mullah Mansour.  The U.S. conducted an airstrike Saturday, May 21, 2016, against the Taliban leader the Pentagon said, and a U.S. official said Mansour was believed to have been killed. Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook said the attack occurred in a remote region along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. He said the U.S. was studying the results of the attack.  (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul, File)

    Mansour’s brief rein as chief marked by turmoil

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour’s brief rule, which ended with his death in a drone strike, was marked by mistrust and strife.

  • This photo taken by freelance photographer Abdul Malik on Saturday, May 21, 2016, purports to show volunteers standing near the wreckage of the destroyed vehicle, in which Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour was allegedly traveling in the Ahmed Wal area in Baluchistan province of Pakistan, near Afghanistan border. A senior commander of the Afghan Taliban confirmed on Sunday that the extremist group's leader, Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour, has been killed in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photo/Abdul Malik)

    Taliban official: Group leader killed in drone strike

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The killing of Afghan Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour in a U.S. drone strike was greeted Sunday by Kabul’s political leadership as a game-changer in efforts to end the long insurgent war plaguing Afghanistan.

  • Migrants wait for food in the makeshift refugee camp near the Horgos border crossing into Hungary, near Horgos, Serbia, Wednesday, May 18, 2016. A small tent city has formed on Serbia’s border with Hungary where migrants are waiting to cross into the European Union despite border closures and a deal with Turkey to stop sea crossings into Greece. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

    Migrants camp on Serbia-Hungary border waiting to cross

    HORGOS, Serbia (AP) — A small tent city has formed on Serbia’s border with Hungary where migrants are waiting to cross into the European Union despite border closures and a deal with Turkey aimed at stopping more people coming.

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, April 21, 2016, unaccompanied minors from Egypt, from left, 16-year-old Fathi, 17-year-old Saied, 17-year-old Gamal, and 17-year-old Ayman, last names not available, sit next to the river Tiber after an interview with The Associated Press, in Fiumicino, 30 kilometers (19 miles) west of Rome. All across Europe, there is a growing shadow population of thousands of under-age migrants who are living on their own, without families. They hide silently and in plain sight, rarely noticed in the crowd. Nobody even knows how many of them there are -- Europol estimates broadly that at least 10,000 kids have gone missing from shelters or reception centers.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

    Thousands of underage migrants live in shadows across Europe

    Outside the train station in Rome, teen migrants sell drugs from school backpacks and trade sex for cash or clothes. In the capital of Sweden, they steal food from supermarkets and sleep on the streets. From makeshift camps along the northern French coast, they try to hop at night onto the backs of moving trucks headed to Britain.

  • In this photo taken on Friday, April 29, 2016, unidentified Egyptian youths hang around at night near Rome's Termini station. All across Europe, there is a growing shadow population of thousands of under-age migrants who are living on their own, without families. Nobody even knows how many of them there are -- Europol estimates broadly that at least 10,000 kids have gone missing from shelters or reception centers.  (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

    Thousands of underage migrants live in shadows across Europe

    Outside the train station in Rome, teen migrants sell drugs from school backpacks and trade sex for cash or clothes. In the capital of Sweden, they steal food from supermarkets and sleep on the streets. From makeshift camps along the northern French coast, they try to hop at night onto the backs of moving trucks headed to Britain.