• Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence talks with Terry Munson, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, in Kokomo, Ind. Munson's home was hit by a tornado that passed through the area Wednesday afternoon. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    When touring disasters, politicians weigh image, distraction

    KOKOMO, Ind. (AP) — In a dramatic, made-for-camera arrival, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence stepped off a Blackhawk helicopter to tour tornado-damaged neighborhoods Thursday, giving out hugs and promising swift assistance a day after several twisters touched down.

  • President Barack Obama is greeted by, from left, Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., Rep. Garret Graves, R-La., Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., and Sen. David Vitter, R-La. after arriving on Air Force One at Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport in Baton Rouge, La., Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016. Obama is traveling to the area to survey the flood damage. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

    Obama visits flood-damaged Louisiana in show of support

    ZACHARY, La. (AP) — Standing amid piles of waterlogged debris, President Barack Obama on Tuesday promised a sustained national effort to rebuild flood-ravaged southern Louisiana “even after the TV cameras leave” on a visit aimed in part at stemming campaign-season criticism that he’s been slow to respond to the disaster.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.