• In this undated handout microscopy photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, the algae pseudo-nitzchia, which produces the toxic domoic acid, is seen from an algae bloom sample that the NOAA ship Bell M. Shimada collected during its survey this summer on the West Coast. One of the largest toxic algae blooms recorded off the West Coast is much denser, more widespread and may go extend deeper than initially thought, say scientists who surveyed the event aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel. (NOAA Fisheries via AP)

    Toxic algae blooming in warm water from California to Alaska

    SEATTLE (AP) — A vast bloom of toxic algae off the West Coast is denser, more widespread and deeper than scientists feared even weeks ago, according to surveyors aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel.

    Updated: 9:22 pm

  • This photo provided by courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics shows, Mark Ruffalo, as Cam Stuart, in a scene from the film, 'Infinitely Polar Bear." Writer-director Maya Forbes based this story on her own childhood experiences. Ruffalo plays a bipolar dad hospitalized after a mental breakdown. (Claire Folger/Sony Pictures Classics via AP)

    Hollywood takes on troubled minds with summer slate of films

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The 1941 film “The Wolf Man” presents Larry Talbot’s transformation from man to wolf as a form of schizophrenia. So little was known about mental illnesses then, the explanation may have seemed plausible.

  • Wolf conservation hits permitting snag in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal fish and wildlife officials are appealing to the state to reconsider its rejection of two permits related to Mexican wolf conservation efforts.

  • In this image takem from a November 2012 video made available by Paula French, a well-known, protected lion known as Cecil strolls around in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe's wildlife minister says extradition is being sought for Walter Palmer, the American dentist who killed a Cecil.  (Paula French via AP)

    Zimbabwe accuses 2nd American of illegally hunting lion

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe has accused a Pennsylvania doctor of illegally killing a lion in April, as it seeks to extradite a Minnesota dentist who killed a well-known lion named Cecil in July.

  • In this image takem from a November 2012 video made available by Paula French, a well-known, protected lion known as Cecil strolls around in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe's wildlife minister says extradition is being sought for Walter Palmer, the American dentist who killed a Cecil.  (Paula French via AP)

    Zimbabwean authorities restrict hunting after lion killing

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe has suspended the hunting of lions, leopards and elephants in an area where a lion popular with tourists was killed, and is investigating the killing of another lion in April that may have been illegal, the country’s wildlife authority said Saturday.

  • Target shooting limited on wildlife area near Nebraska City

    NEBRASKA CITY, Neb. (AP) — The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission has banned target shooting from portions of Hamburg Bend Wildlife Management Area for safety issues.

  • Correction: Zimbabwe-Lion Killed-3 Things story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story July 29 about U.S. regulations and big game hunting, The Associated Press erroneously referred to The Human Society of the United States. It is The Humane Society of the United States.

  • In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone. (Andy Loveridge/Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP)

    For some, hunting lions in Africa is the ultimate experience

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — It is, for some well-heeled foreign visitors, the ultimate African experience: the thrill of hunting a lion, one of the “Big Five” animals whose habitats are under increasing pressure from human encroachment. Now an American dentist’s killing of a celebrity lion in Zimbabwe has triggered global revulsion, highlighting what critics say is an industry of trophy hunting that threatens vulnerable species across sub-Saharan Africa.

  • In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone. (Andy Loveridge/Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP)

    Minnesota man who killed lion keeps low profile amid outrage

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe prosecutors Thursday are still trying to figure out how to charge one of the suspects in the killing of Cecil the lion by an American dentist that has outraged animal lovers.

  • A woman writes on a sign outside Dr. Walter James Palmer's dental office in Bloomington, Minn., Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Palmer reportedly paid $50,000 to track and kill a black-maned lion, just outside Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)

    Minnesota dentist rarely discussed hunting with patients

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A Minnesota dentist who has become the target of worldwide outrage for hunting and killing a protected lion in Zimbabwe advised patients Wednesday to seek care elsewhere and said he rarely discussed his big-game hunting because it can be a “divisive and emotionally charged topic.”