• In this Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016 photo, Christine Miller sits among some of the 250 marijuana plants on her farm near Benbow, Calif. Miller is concerned about the increased cost to operate her 250-plant farm if California voters approve Proposition 64, the Nov. 8 ballot initiative that would legalize the recreational use of marijuana. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    Pot farmers worry legalization could end their way of life

    GARBERVILLE, Calif. (AP) — Laura Costa’s son and husband moved quickly with pruning shears as they harvested the family’s fall marijuana crop, racing along with several workers to cut the plants and drop them in plastic bins ahead of an impending storm.

  • In this Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speak during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis. Trump gets outsized attention for what he’s tweeting and retweeting on a near-daily basis. But Clinton has a formidable digital media army, her own app and a rapid response team ready to blast out shareable soundbites from convention speeches, photos, videos and even temporary location-specific Snapchat filters mocking Republicans. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

    The Trump-Clinton Twitter war: Bludgeon vs. stiletto

    NEW YORK (AP) — Back in June, when Donald Trump slammed President Barack Obama’s endorsement of Hillary Clinton on Twitter, the Democrat’s campaign was quick to tweet back a chilly three-word response: “Delete your account .”

  • In this Oct. 21, 2016 photo, students arrive at Falmouth High School in Falmouth, Maine. The town of Falmouth is one of several municipalities around the country that has canceled school on Election Day to avoid placing children at risk in case the heated rhetoric spills into confrontations or even violence at the polling places. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Fearing Election Day trouble, some US schools cancel classes

    FALMOUTH, Maine (AP) — Rigged elections. Vigilante observers. Angry voters. The claims, threats and passions surrounding the presidential race have led communities around the U.S. to move polling places out of schools or cancel classes on Election Day.

  • In this Oct. 22, 2016 file photo, singer Katy Perry speaks at a rally in support of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, in Las Vegas. With Election Day nearing, a massive celebrity strike force is fanning out for Clinton, who is leading Donald Trump in most polls. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

    Celebrities of all types are fanning out for Clinton

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — For television actress Busy Philipps, campaigning for Hillary Clinton isn’t always glamorous.

  • In this Oct. 20, 2008, photo provided by Nikola Halycyone Jordan, Jordan poses with her election ballot in Omaha, Neb. Jordan believes the selfies are a great way not only to share her views on the issues, but also to stress the importance of voting and being civically active. A Nebraska lawmaker added a provision to state election law in 2016 to allow ballot selfies. (Mari Zaporowski/Courtesy of Nikola Halycyone Jordan via AP)

    Posting ballot selfies: Personal choice or illegal act?

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — You probably already know whether you’ll vote for Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton on Election Day, leaving one important question to consider when you walk into your polling place: Is it OK to take a picture of your ballot?

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, at the conclusion of the 71st annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner, a charity gala organized by the Archdiocese of New York, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Trump, Clinton trade caustic barbs as roast turns bitter

    NEW YORK (AP) — The annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner, a white-tie gala in New York that is often the last time the two presidential nominees share a stage before Election Day, is traditionally a time when campaign hostilities are set aside.