• Trump’s Taiwan call, tweets point to flashpoints with China

    In this combination of three 2016 file photos shows, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, left, speaking at a ceremony at the Gen. Andres Rodriguez school in Asuncion, Paraguay, on June 29, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, center, talking with President Barack Obama at White House in Washington, U.S.A. on Nov. 10, and China's President Xi Jinping arriving at La Moneda presidential palace in Santiago, Chile, on Nov. 22. With Trump's latest tweets touching on sensitive issues, China must decide how to handle an incoming American president who relishes confrontation and whose online statements appear to foreshadow shifts in foreign policy. China awoke Monday, Dec. 5, to criticism from Trump on Twitter, days after it responded to his telephone conversation with Taiwan's president by accusing the Taiwanese of playing a "little trick" on Trump. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz, Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Luis Hidalgo, Files)

    BEIJING (AP) — Donald Trump’s unprecedented phone conversation with Taiwan’s president and tweets criticizing China point to the possibility of major friction between the world’s two largest economies.

  • Trump’s call inspires hope in Taiwan, concern in Beijing

    This combination of two photos shows U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, left, speaking during a "USA Thank You" tour event in Cincinatti Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, and Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, delivering a speech during National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. Trump spoke Friday, Dec. 2, with Tsai, a move that will be sure to anger China. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Chinag Ying-ying, File)

    TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — With a 10-minute phone call and two tweets, Donald Trump inspired banner headlines and renewed hopes across Taiwan for a stronger partnership with the United States, while also inflaming the complex relationships between the U.S., mainland China, and the self-governing island China regards as a renegade province.

  • Timeline of China-Taiwan relations

    In this Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 photo released by Taiwan Presidential Office Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump through a speaker phone in Taipei, Taiwan. (Taiwan Presidential Office via AP)

    BEIJING (AP) — China and Taiwan have been separately ruled since the Chinese civil war of the 1940s, but China claims sovereignty over the island and insists the two sides eventually unify. The status of Taiwan became an issue this weekend after President-elect Donald Trump broke with long-standing tradition and directly spoke with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen, drawing an irritated response from China.

  • Trump shrugs off fuss over Taiwan call

    In this Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 photo released by Taiwan Presidential Office Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump through a speaker phone in Taipei, Taiwan. (Taiwan Presidential Office via AP)

    BEIJING (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump is unapologetic about roiling diplomatic waters with his decision to speak on the phone with Taiwan’s leader, a breach of long-standing tradition that risks enmity from China.

  • Air pollution becomes Israel-Palestinian wedge issue

    In this photo taken Monday, Nov. 21, 2016, Palestinian laborer Sami Abu Baker, 35, who has a fifteen years service in the charcoal factories, poses for a picture during a day work, in the West Bank town of Yabad, near Jenin. For years, residents of central Israel have been complaining about the air pollution emanating from nearby Palestinian factories in the West Bank and the potential health hazards they pose. But now that authorities have finally cracked down, shutting the worst offending charcoal plants, Palestinians say hundreds have been put out of work in a swift stamp of the military occupation.(AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

    YABED, West Bank (AP) — For years, residents of central Israel have been complaining about air pollution from Palestinian factories in the nearby West Bank. Now that authorities have finally cracked down, shutting a group of the worst offending charcoal plants in one notorious town, Palestinians complain that hundreds were thrown out of work by their military occupiers.