• The Latest: California governor expresses sadness in fire

    This photo provided by @seungylee14  shows the scene of a fire in Oakland, early Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016.   The blaze began at about 11:30 p.m. on Friday during a party at a warehouse in the San Francisco Bay Area city.  Several people were unaccounted for.  (@seungylee14 via AP)

    OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a deadly fire in a converted warehouse in Oakland, California (all times local):

  • Emergency officials: We won’t let pipeline protesters freeze

    A woman watches the sunset at the Oceti Sakowin camp where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Friday, Dec. 2, 2016. Hundreds of protesters fighting the Dakota Access pipeline have shrugged off the heavy snow, icy winds and frigid temperatures that have swirled around their large encampment. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

    FARGO, N.D. (AP) — The head of North Dakota’s emergency management services says the state is prepared to respond to Dakota Access pipeline protesters who may need help during a winter storm or some other crisis.

    Updated: 1:33 pm

  • Alabama inmate seeks execution stay from US Supreme Court

    This undated photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows Ronald Bert Smith. Smith, who is scheduled to be executed next week, is asking the governor to stop his execution because a judge imposed a death sentence over the jury's 7-5 recommendation of life imprisonment. Smith will be executed Dec. 8 for the 1994 slaying of Huntsville convenience store clerk Casey Wilson. (Alabama Department of Corrections via AP)

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama inmate on Friday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to stay his upcoming execution to consider whether a judge should have been able to give him a death sentence when the jury recommended life imprisonment.

  • Emails: LGBT law cost N. Carolina project with 700 jobs

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Internal emails show that city and state officials blame a North Carolina law limiting LGBT protections for a company’s decision to pick another state for a new project that includes 700 jobs.

  • Alabama death row inmate asks governor for clemency

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama inmate scheduled to be executed next week is asking the governor to stop his execution because a judge imposed a death sentence over the jury’s recommendation of life imprisonment.

  • The Latest: Republican vows to reverse land planning change

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Latest on an overhaul of federal land-use planning for almost 250 million acres in the U.S. West (all times local):

  • The Latest: Public defender standoff reaches Supreme Court

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The Latest on a funding crisis in the New Mexico judiciary system (all times local):

  • Government revenues falter in New Mexico

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico government revenue streams declined by more than 9 percent during the first quarter of the current fiscal year, state fiscal analysts announced Tuesday.

  • US officials will review status of lesser prairie chicken

    FILE- In this April 7, 1999, file photo, a male lesser prairie chicken climbs a sage limb to rise above the others at a breeding area near Follett, Texas. The lesser prairie chicken was removed from the threatened and endangered species list earlier this year following court rulings in Texas and a decision by government lawyers not to pursue an appeal. However, federal wildlife officials on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, agreed to reconsider the status of a grouse found in pockets across the Great Plains as environmentalists fight to return the bird to the list of protected species. (David Crenshaw  /Tulsa World via AP, File)

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal wildlife officials on Tuesday agreed to reconsider the status of a grouse found in pockets across the Great Plains as environmentalists fight to return the bird to the list of protected species.

  • Pipeline protest arrests strain North Dakota’s court system

    In this photo provided by Nancy Trevino, protesters against the Dakota Access oil pipeline gather at and around a hill, referred to as Turtle Island, where demonstrators claim burial sites are located, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2016 in Cannon Ball, N.D. The hill is across a body of water from where hundreds and times thousands of people have camped out for months to protest the construction of the four-state pipeline. (Nancy Trevino via AP)

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The hundreds of arrests during the months of protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota have created an unprecedented burden for the state’s court system, which faces huge cost overruns and doesn’t have enough judges, lawyers and clerks to handle the workload.