• In this undated handout microscopy photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, the algae pseudo-nitzchia, which produces the toxic domoic acid, is seen from an algae bloom sample that the NOAA ship Bell M. Shimada collected during its survey this summer on the West Coast. One of the largest toxic algae blooms recorded off the West Coast is much denser, more widespread and may go extend deeper than initially thought, say scientists who surveyed the event aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel. (NOAA Fisheries via AP)

    Toxic algae blooming in warm water from California to Alaska

    SEATTLE (AP) — A vast bloom of toxic algae off the West Coast is denser, more widespread and deeper than scientists feared even weeks ago, according to surveyors aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel.

    Updated: 9:22 pm

  • US lab in New Mexico, Univ. of Arizona team up on research

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A military laboratory in New Mexico and the University of Arizona have agreed to collaborate on technological research.

  • Deer hunting: 5 myths and misconceptions

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Myths about wildlife are probably as old as man, and deer hunting has more than its share. While many have likely come and gone, others can still be heard at deer camps.

  • Los Alamos vigils eye 70th anniversary of atomic bombings

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (AP) — Peace advocates are planning peace vigils in Los Alamos to mark the 70th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  • FILE- In this July 17, 2015, file photo, a car drives by HitchBOT, a hitchhiking robot in Marblehead, Mass. The Canadian researchers who created hitchBOT as a social experiment say someone in Philadelphia damaged the robot beyond repair on Saturday, Aug. 1, ending its brief American tour. The robot was trying to travel cross-country after successfully hitchhiking across Canada last year and parts of Europe. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)

    Creators of destroyed hitchhiking robot mull rebuild

    TORONTO (AP) — Collapsed among trash and dead leaves, its arms ripped off and its skull and brain nowhere in sight, the talking and tweeting hitchhiking robot from Canada met its untimely end in Philadelphia over the weekend.

  • Alois Jnabl of Austria exits the water during the men's triathlon ITU World Olympic Qualification Event in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 2, 2015. The World Olympic Qualification is a test event for the Rio 2016 Olympics. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    IOC to order tests for viruses at Rio’s Olympic water venues

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The International Olympic Committee said Sunday it will order testing for disease-causing viruses in the sewage-polluted waters where athletes will compete in next year’s Rio de Janeiro Games.

  • Challenger, Columbia wreckage on public display for 1st time

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA is offering up wreckage from the Challenger and Columbia for public view after hiding it from the world for decades.

  • ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, AUG. 2, 2015 AND THEREAFTER - In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, Martin Meltzer stands in his office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Meltzer has made predictions on pandemic flu, smallpox, and other contagious diseases. Experts call the work "modeling." Only a few hundreds U.S. scientists do this kind of work seriously, and many of them regard Meltzer as the most famous, and infamous, disease modeler at the CDC. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

    CDC’s top modeler makes estimates and courts controversy

    ATLANTA (AP) — Last fall, when Martin Meltzer calculated that 1.4 million people might contract Ebola in West Africa, the world paid attention.

  • In this March 7, 2015 file photo, a health worker, right, cleans a man's arm before injecting him with a Ebola vaccine  in Conakry, Guinea. An experimental vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea exposed to Ebola seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday, July 31, 2015. There is currently no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola, which has so far killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa since the world’s biggest outbreak began last year.  (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah, File)

    Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa

    LONDON (AP) — An experimental Ebola vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea seems to work and might help shut down the waning epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday.

  • In this April 13, 2014, file photo taken from the Royal New Zealand air force (RNZAF) P-3K2-Orion aircraft, co-pilot Squadron Leader Brett McKenzie looks out of a window while searching for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, in the Indian Ocean off the coast of western Australia.  Even with the recent discovery of a possible wing fragment from the missing airplane on Wednesday, July 29, 2015,  on a remote island in the Indian Ocean, tracing the route of the debris back across Indian Ocean may prove impossible. (Greg Wood/Pool Photo via AP)

    Tracing back debris to find Flight 370 may prove impossible

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — If it’s confirmed that a wing fragment found on a remote island in the Indian Ocean is from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, lost more than 500 days ago, could scientists use their knowledge of ocean currents to trace back its path and pinpoint the bulk of the wreck?