• ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, AUG. 2, 2015 AND THEREAFTER - In this Friday, June 12, 2015 photo, Martin Meltzer stands in his office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Meltzer has made predictions on pandemic flu, smallpox, and other contagious diseases. Experts call the work "modeling." Only a few hundreds U.S. scientists do this kind of work seriously, and many of them regard Meltzer as the most famous, and infamous, disease modeler at the CDC. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

    CDC’s top modeler makes estimates and courts controversy

    ATLANTA (AP) — Last fall, when Martin Meltzer calculated that 1.4 million people might contract Ebola in West Africa, the world paid attention.

    Updated: 11:06 am

  • In this March 7, 2015 file photo, a health worker, right, cleans a man's arm before injecting him with a Ebola vaccine  in Conakry, Guinea. An experimental vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea exposed to Ebola seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday, July 31, 2015. There is currently no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola, which has so far killed more than 11,000 people in West Africa since the world’s biggest outbreak began last year.  (AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah, File)

    Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa

    LONDON (AP) — An experimental Ebola vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea seems to work and might help shut down the waning epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday.

  • In this April 13, 2014, file photo taken from the Royal New Zealand air force (RNZAF) P-3K2-Orion aircraft, co-pilot Squadron Leader Brett McKenzie looks out of a window while searching for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, in the Indian Ocean off the coast of western Australia.  Even with the recent discovery of a possible wing fragment from the missing airplane on Wednesday, July 29, 2015,  on a remote island in the Indian Ocean, tracing the route of the debris back across Indian Ocean may prove impossible. (Greg Wood/Pool Photo via AP)

    Tracing back debris to find Flight 370 may prove impossible

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — If it’s confirmed that a wing fragment found on a remote island in the Indian Ocean is from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, lost more than 500 days ago, could scientists use their knowledge of ocean currents to trace back its path and pinpoint the bulk of the wreck?