• Who’s next? A look at South Korean presidential contenders

    In this Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, file photo, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks to the Associated Press during an interview, in Marrakech, Morocco. With lawmakers voting to impeach her over an explosive corruption scandal, South Korean President Park Geun-hye’s days in office seem numbered. Her potential successors include the outgoing secretary general of the United Nations, an ambitious mayor compared to both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders and the man who lost the presidential election to Park four years ago. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy, File)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Fresh off impeachment, South Korean President Park Geun-hye’s days in office may be numbered.

  • After weeks of protests, crowds celebrate Park’s impeachment

    Protesters carry an effigy of impeached South Korean President Park Geun-hye as they march toward the presidential house during a rally in Seoul Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016. Shifting from protests to celebration, large crowds of South Koreans were expected to march near the presidential house on Saturday to cheer the impeachment of disgraced president over an explosive corruption scandal. The sign read "Impeach Park Geun-hye immediately." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The previous time South Korea’s parliament voted to impeach a president, ruling party lawmakers bawled and hurled ballot boxes, a man set himself on fire in front of the National Assembly, and thousands glumly held candlelight vigils night after night to save late liberal President Roh Moo-hyun.

    Updated: 12:26 pm

  • South Korean president is impeached in stunning fall

    South Korean President Park Geun-hye adjusts a microphone during an emergency Cabinet meeting at the presidential office in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. South Korean lawmakers earlier on Friday impeached Park, a stunning and swift fall for the country's first female leader amid protests that drew millions into the streets in united fury. (Baek Sung-ryul/Yonhap via AP)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean lawmakers on Friday impeached President Park Geun-hye, a stunning and swift fall for the country’s first female leader amid protests that drew millions into the streets in united fury.

  • SKorea president impeachment ruins legacy of dictator father

    A protester dances after hearing the President Park Geun-hye's impeachment in front of the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. South Korean lawmakers on Friday voted to impeach President Park Geun-hye, a stunning and swift fall for the country's first female leader amid protests that drew millions into the streets in united fury. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Park Geun-hye could always rely on one unwavering gift throughout a political career that saw a triumphant return as South Korea’s first female president to the palatial Blue House where she’d lived as a girl: She always enjoyed the reflected devotion, some might say worship, that half the country felt for her late dictator father.

  • S. Korea’s interim leader was Park defender; powers unclear

    In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, file photo, South Korean Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn makes an official visit to Paris, France. Taking over as government caretaker in the wake of Friday's vote to impeach President Park Geun-hye, Hwang is seen as a stiff and uncompromising defender of the fallen leader. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The man who takes over as government caretaker in the wake of President Park Geun-hye’s impeachment is seen by critics as a stiff and uncompromising defender of the fallen leader.

  • Colleges pushed to note sexual misconduct on transcripts

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Colleges that expel students whom they suspect of having committed sexual assault are being asked to go further by specifying the reason for expulsion on their transcripts.

  • South Korea’s Park would leave economy mired in challenges

    Lee Jae-yong, a vice chairman of Samsung Electronics Co. arrives for hearing at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. South Korea's most powerful business leaders from Samsung, Hyundai Motor and six other companies face grilling as lawmakers probe their links to a corruption scandal involving South Korea's president and her confidante. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The heir to the Samsung empire and other tycoons took a public drubbing by lawmakers Tuesday over deep-rooted ties between politics and business that helped drive South Korea’s economic ascent but are central to its political crisis.

  • Israeli TV journalist becomes a thorn in Netanyahu’s side

    This Oct. 29, 2014 photo made at Channel 10 studios in Givatayim near Tel Aviv, Israel, shows Raviv Drucker, Channel 10 TV's investigative reporter who has exposed scandal after scandal about the Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu. Netanyahu has berated him, sued him and even reportedly tried to get him fired in a visceral campaign to counter his critics. (AP Photo/Tomer Appelbaum)

    JERUSALEM (AP) — After a series of embarrassing reports about Israel’s first family, an investigative journalist has become a particular target of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.