• Trump DC hotel attracting foreign envoys and controversy

    In this Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump, left, and Vice President-elect Mike Pence acknowledge the crowd during the first stop of his post-election tour, in Cincinnati. The Heritage Foundation says Pence will deliver a speech Tuesday night, Dec. 6, 2016, to a conservative group at Trump’s new hotel in Washington, about areas of focus for the Trump administration in the first 200 days. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

    NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump’s new luxury hotel in Washington D.C. has been attracting foreign envoys, special interest groups — and a bit of controversy.

  • Bach, Reedie clear air over Russian doping scandal

    In this Feb. 1, 2016, file photo, International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach, second from left, is flaked by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, and LA 2024 chairman Casey Wasserman, second from right, and UCLA chancellor Gene Block, right, during a news conference in Los Angeles. Bach is visiting Los Angeles to check out proposed venues for the 2024 Olympic Games. The Los Angeles bid committee for the 2024 Olympics is projecting a $5.3 billion budget, a number that would be less than half the cost of the recently completed Rio de Janeiro Games and about a quarter of where Tokyo’s ballooning budget for 2020 currently stands. Bid officials say they can do this because more than 30 venues already exist and those that don't will be built as temporary structures. . (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)

    LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — With another report on Russian doping looming at the end of this week, the presidents of the IOC and World Anti-Doping Agency met Monday to clear the air over their “perceived differences” over the handling of previous evidence of systematic cheating in Russia.

  • A look at the music accompanying massive S. Korean rallies

    In this Nov 26, 2016, file photo, protesters beat their drums as they march toward the presidential house during a rally calling for South Korean President Park Geun-hye to step down in Seoul, South Korea.  Any good South Korean protest needs a soundtrack, and the music that accompanies the massive rallies on the verge of bringing down President Park includes the mournful, the tongue-and-cheek and a smattering of defiance. Music resounds in the crammed streets around South Korea’s presidential palace. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Any good South Korean protest needs a soundtrack, and the music that accompanies the massive rallies on the verge of bringing down President Park Geun-hye includes the mournful, the tongue-and-cheek and a smattering of defiance from “Les Miserables.”

  • Athletics overwhelmingly backs broad reforms

    President of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) Sebastian Coe, delivers a speech during the 2016 World Athletics Gala Awards, Friday, Dec. 2, 2016, in Monaco.  Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt, and Ethiopian long-distance runner Almaz Ayana were awarded " 2016 Athlete of the Year " by the International Athletic Foundation (IAAF). (AP Photo/Claude Paris)

    MONACO (AP) — Athletics leaders have overwhelmingly approved broad changes championed by the sport’s president, Sebastian Coe, to turn a corner on reputation-wrecking corruption and doping scandals.

  • S. Koreans rally for 6th weekend calling for leader’s ouster

    Protesters shout slogans as they march toward the presidential house during a rally calling for South Korean President Park Geun-hye to step down in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016. Hundreds of thousands of South Koreans marched in the capital for the sixth straight Saturday calling for the removal of scandal-plagued Park, who faces an impeachment vote in parliament next week. The banners read: "Park Geun-hye to step down." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon).

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Rallying for the sixth straight weekend in what has become perhaps South Korea’s biggest protest movement ever, hundreds of thousands of demonstrators in Seoul got the closest yet Saturday to the president they desperately want removed.

  • S. Koreans to march for 6th weekend calling for Park ouster

    In this photo taken on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016, South Korean protesters hold up candles during a rally calling for South Korean President Park Geun-hye to step down in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea's main opposition parties said Friday they will push for a vote next week on President Park Geun-hye's impeachment. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of South Koreans are expected to march in capital Seoul for the sixth straight Saturday calling for the removal of scandal-plagued President Park Geun-hye, who faces an impeachment vote in parliament next week.

  • Conflict rules hardly the same for president, others

    In this Nov. 19, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump gives the thumbs-up as he arrive at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Trump, ethics attorneys and good-government groups are all grappling with how to navigate being a president with extraordinary international and domestic business ties. While others in government are bound by rules and regulations about their business ties, the president has fewer such restrictions. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. David McKinley has sold his West Virginia engineering and architecture firm, but it still bears his name — and that earned the Republican congressman a rebuke from the House Ethics Committee.

  • Analysis: S. Korea leader again buys time, but failure looms

    A worker prepares to deliver newspapers reporting on South Korean President Park Geun-hye's public announcement at a distrobution station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. South Korean President Park Geun-hye said Tuesday that she'll resign — if parliament arranges the technical details — in her latest attempt to fend off impeachment efforts and massive street protests amid prosecution claims that a corrupt confidante wielded government power from the shadows. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — She pulled off a deft bit of political maneuvering, probably born of desperation. Now South Korea’s president has a sliver of breathing space as impeachment closes in and millions throng the streets to clamor for her to just go away.