• Lawsuit: Bosses let rules-breaking sailor compete in Cup

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Top officials with Oracle Team USA knew grinder Matt Mitchell didn’t illegally alter a catamaran used in warmup regattas and yet let a rules-breaking sailor compete in the 2013 America’s Cup, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco.

  • Ministers from 12 nations negotiating a Pacific Rim trade pact hold a news conference in Lahaina, Hawaii, Friday, July 31, 2015, saying they made significant progress in reaching an agreement. The ministers, from left, are Australia Minister for Trade and Investment Andrew Robb, Brunei Second Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Lim Jock Seng, Canada Minister of International Trade Ed Fast, Chile Director General of International Relations Andres Rebolledo, Japan Economic and Fiscal Policy Minister Akira Amari, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, Malaysia Minister of International Trade and Industry Mustapa Mohamed, Mexico Secretary of the Economy Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal, New Zealand Minister of Trade Tim Groser, Peru Minister of Foreign Trade and Tourism  Magali Silva and Singapore Minister for Trade and Industry Hng Kiang Lim.  (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)

    Pacific trade ministers fail to reach deal in Hawaii talks

    LAHAINA, Hawaii (AP) — Trade ministers from a dozen Pacific Rim nations failed to reach a deal on a new trade agreement that would cover nearly 40 percent of the global economy, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman said Friday.

  • Former America’s Cup sailor sues champion Oracle Team USA

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A former America’s Cup sailor is suing two-time defending champion Oracle Team USA for $400,000 for failing to fire or suspend a crewmate during the biggest cheating scandal in regatta history.

  • In this April 13, 2014, file photo taken from the Royal New Zealand air force (RNZAF) P-3K2-Orion aircraft, co-pilot Squadron Leader Brett McKenzie looks out of a window while searching for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, in the Indian Ocean off the coast of western Australia.  Even with the recent discovery of a possible wing fragment from the missing airplane on Wednesday, July 29, 2015,  on a remote island in the Indian Ocean, tracing the route of the debris back across Indian Ocean may prove impossible. (Greg Wood/Pool Photo via AP)

    Tracing back debris to find Flight 370 may prove impossible

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — If it’s confirmed that a wing fragment found on a remote island in the Indian Ocean is from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, lost more than 500 days ago, could scientists use their knowledge of ocean currents to trace back its path and pinpoint the bulk of the wreck?

  • Jacquita Gomes, 53, checks her mobile phone at her office in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Thursday, July 30, 2015.  Gomes is torn about whether to believe that plane debris found more than 16 months after the mysterious disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is the first concrete evidence that her husband is truly gone. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

    Relatives torn over possible 1st debris from missing MH370

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Jacquita Gomes is torn about whether to believe that plane debris found more than 16 months after the mysterious disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is the first concrete evidence that her husband is truly gone.