• Embattled Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore testifies during his ethics trial before the Alabama Court of the Judiciary at the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., on Wednesday Sept. 28, 2016. (Mickey Welsh/Montgomery Advertiser via AP)

    Alabama justice off bench for defying feds on gay marriage

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore was removed from the bench Friday for defying the U.S. Supreme Court on gay marriage, more than a decade after he got in trouble for refusing federal orders to move a Ten Commandments monument.

  • FILE- In this Sept. 28, 2016 image taken from video and provided by C-SPAN2, the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington is shown as the Senate acted decisively to override President Barack Obama's veto of Sept. 11 legislation. Although Congress has allowed Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia over claims it had a role in the terror attacks, a federal judge has blasted the legal case at the heart of the debate as notoriously weak and full of "largely boilerplate" accusations. And the revised law that passed this week over President Barack Obama's veto gives the Justice Department sweeping authority to put the case on hold and fails to eliminate sovereign immunity from protecting Saudi Arabia assets. (C-SPAN2 via AP, File)

    Sept. 11 families can now sue the Saudis but will it matter?

    NEW YORK (AP) — Just because Congress has allowed Sept. 11 victims to sue Saudi Arabia over claims it had a role in the terror attacks doesn’t mean such a case will ever go before a jury.

  • President Barack Obama, with first lady Michelle Obama, hugs Olympic gold medal gymnast Simone Biles, after she presented him with a surf board signed by the U.S. 2016 Olympians during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, where the president  honored the members of the 2016 United States Summer Olympic and Paralympic Teams. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Congress blocks ‘victory tax’ on Olympic athletes

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Olympic athletes would be exempt from a so-called victory tax under legislation approved by Congress and sent to the president.

  • This photo provided by Anthony Pidgeon, taken Aug. 21, 2015, shows the Asian-American band The Slants, from left, Joe X Jiang, Ken Shima, Tyler Chen, Simon "Young" Tam, Joe X Jiang in Old Town Chinatown, Portland, Ore. The Supreme Court will hear a First Amendment challenge over the government's refusal to register offensive trademarks in a case that could affect the Washington Redskins. The justices agreed Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, to take up a dispute involving an Asian-American rock band called the Slants, but did not act on a separate request to hear the higher-profile Redskins case at the same time. (Anthony Pidgeon/Redferns via AP)

    Supreme Court to hear challenge over offensive trademarks

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up a First Amendment clash over the government’s refusal to register offensive trademarks, a case that could affect the Washington Redskins in their legal fight over the team name.

  • Soft drink and soda bottles are displayed in a refrigerator at El Ahorro market in San Francisco, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. In November 2016, voters in San Francisco and Oakland will consider a penny per ounce tax on sugar laden drinks such as bottled cola, sports drinks and iced teas in November. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

    US soda-tax battle bubbles up in San Francisco Bay Area

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The national fight over sugary soda is bubbling up in the San Francisco Bay Area, where voters in November will consider a tax on the drinks that many health experts say contribute to diabetes, obesity and tooth decay.

  • New Mexico high court to settle dispute over pollution rules

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Environmentalists say New Mexico isn’t going far enough to protect the state’s limited groundwater supplies from copper mining operations.

  • Editorial Roundup: Excerpts from recent editorials

    Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad:

  • Supreme Court asked to block $1B NFL concussion settlement

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A second petition has been filed asking the U.S. Supreme Court to reject the $1 billion settlement of NFL concussion lawsuits because of how it treats current brain injuries versus future ones.

  • In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Melbourne, Fla. While Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs, if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him. (AP Photo/John Locher)

    Trump turned over tax returns _ for lawsuits, loans, casinos

    WASHINGTON (AP) — While Donald Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs — if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.

  • In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Melbourne, Fla. While Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs, if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him. (AP Photo/John Locher)

    Trump has turned over tax returns _ for lawsuits and loans

    WASHINGTON (AP) — While Donald Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs — if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.