• In this Tuesday, June 30, 2015 photo, a young protester affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood waves a flare while leading chants on the second anniversary of the ouster of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi as they protest in the Matariya neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt. Young Islamists are growing increasingly open in their calls for violence and a move toward extremism, frustrated by the police crackdown since the military ousted Morsi in 2013. Some want to avenge friends and family killed or abused by police. (AP Photo/Belal Darder)

    Egypt’s disaffected youth increasingly calling for violence

    CAIRO (AP) — The 20-year-old law student says he has had enough of fruitless protests in support of Egypt’s deposed Islamist president, two years of a losing struggle with police.

    Updated: 6:52 am

  • In this Friday, July 31, 2015 photo, Metin Bekiroglu, right, accompanied by others talk about the recent round of violence between Turkey and Kurdish rebels, at a teahouse in the town of Lice, in southeastern Turkey. In an abrupt reversal, Turkey and the Kurdish rebels appear to be hurtling toward the return of an all-out conflict that plagued the nation for decades, before a fragile peace process was launched in 2012. (AP Photo/Desmond Butler)

    Turkey, Kurd rebels gear up for return to all-out conflict

    LICE, Turkey (AP) — The military helicopters swooped in over the Kurdish heartland and dropped white incendiary powder on a raging brush fire — igniting a massive conflagration that raced through the mountains, devouring orchards and livestock. For Kurds living in nearby Lice, the recent Turkish operation brought back memories of the traumatic days in the 1990s when the army twice burned the town to the ground.

  • Afghan boys walk along in front of Mullah Mohammad Omar's house, in Kandahar province, south of Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, July 31, 2015. The Taliban confirmed the death of longtime leader Mullah Omar and appointed his successor Thursday, as a new round of peace talks was indefinitely postponed amid concerns over how committed the new leadership is to ending the militant group's 14-year insurgency. (AP Photo/Allauddin Khan)

    Afghan Taliban praise new leader as rift in ranks appears

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The first signs of the deep fractures within the Afghan Taliban surfaced on Friday as the son of Mullah Mohammad Omar rejected the choice of his successor, just hours after the group issued a statement praising their new leader as one of the late chief’s most “trusted” associates.

  • Wednesday, July 29, 2015

    Taliban leader Mullah Omar’s death is announced 2 years after his life in the shadows ended

  • In this undated image released by the FBI, Mullah Omar is seen in a wanted poster. An Afghan official says his government is examining claims that reclusive Taliban leader Mullah Omar is dead. The Taliban could not be immediately reached for comment on the government’s claims about Omar, who has been declared dead many times before.  (FBI via AP, File)

    Taliban leader Mullah Omar, reclusive in life and death

    Mullah Mohammad Omar, the secretive head of the Taliban and an al-Qaida ally who led a bloody insurgency against U.S.-led forces, eluded capture for more than a decade in spite of being one of the most-hunted fugitives on Earth.