• In this Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 photo, Samir Qasu, 46, center, a Yazidi migrant from Sinjar, Iraq, laughs while speaking on his mobile phone as he and his wife Bessi Qasim, 43, left, and his son Dildar Qasu, 11, enjoy their time at a cafe in Freiburg, Germany. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

    Tumult to tranquility: Migrant family finds peace in Germany

    ELZACH, Germany (AP) — They fled Iraq just ahead of an Islamic State group onslaught in which thousands of their fellow Yazidis were enslaved or slaughtered. Months as refugees on the fringes of Turkish society, a nearly fatal trip across the Aegean and a long trek through the Balkans and Austria north to Germany came next.

    Updated: 7:31 am

  • Editorial Roundup: Excerpts from recent editorials

    Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad:

  • In this Sept. 22, 2016 file photo, Defense Secretary Ash Carter, accompanied by Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. The U.S. is sending 615 more troops to Iraq as the stage is set for an Iraqi-led battle to reclaim Mosul, the northern city that has been the Islamic State group's main stronghold for more than two years. The offensive, starting as soon as October, looms as a decisive moment for Iraq and for President Barack Obama's much-criticized strategy to defeat IS. "These forces will be primarily to enable Iraqi security forces and also (Kurdish) Peshmerga in the operations to isolate and collapse ISIL's control over Mosul, but also to protect and expand Iraqi security forces' gains elsewhere in Iraq," Defense Secretary Ash Carter told reporters Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

    Officials: US to send more troops to Iraq to help with Mosul

    ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico (AP) — The U.S. is sending 615 more troops to Iraq as the stage is set for an Iraqi-led battle to reclaim Mosul, the northern city that has been the Islamic State group’s main stronghold for more than two years. The offensive, starting as soon as October, looms as a decisive moment for Iraq and for President Barack Obama’s much-criticized strategy to defeat IS.

  • President Barack Obama jumps up the stairs to take the stage to speak to members of the military community, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, in Fort Lee, Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama plans to visit with troops at central Virginia base

    FORT LEE, Va. (AP) — Asked by a service member to weigh in on some NFL players kneeling during the national anthem, President Barack Obama said Wednesday he hoped the controversy would spark Americans to listen to others’ concerns and not just go into separate corners.