• Indians look for solutions only when toxic pollution soars

    In this Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016 photo, people ride a motorcycle carrying air purifiers at a traffic intersection surrounded by a thick layer of smog in New Delhi, India. The news that the Indian capital is one of the dirtiest cities in the world, having surpassed Beijing for that dubious record, is three years old. But the awareness that it's toxic enough to leave its citizens chronically ill and requires long-term lifestyle changes is relatively nascent. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

    NEW DELHI (AP) — The truth of New Delhi’s toxic air finally hit home for Rakhi Singh when her 3-year-old son began to cough constantly early this year. She bought air purifiers for her home. When a thick, gray haze turned the view outside her home into a scene from a bad science fiction film last month, she bought pollution masks.

  • In remote Indian village, cannabis is its only livelihood

    In this Tuesday Oct. 4, 2016 photo, Jabe Ram speaks on a mobile phone outside his home on the upper end of Malana village in the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. Malana has become one of the world's top stoner destinations, and a symbolical battleground for India's fight against 'charas,' the black and sticky hashish that has made the village famous. "They want us to completely stop growing marijuana. But we keep sowing it," Ram said. "If the government helped us in some way and protected us from hunger and cold, we would maybe consider stopping. Obviously, we are not going to go hungry. Even if we have to go to jail for it, so be it." (AP Photo/Rishabh R. Jain)

    MALANA, India (AP) — For hundreds of years, the tiny village was just a speck lost amid the grandiose mountains of the Indian Himalayas.

  • In remote Indian village, cannabis is its only livelihood

    In this Tuesday Oct. 4, 2016 photo, Jabe Ram speaks on a mobile phone outside his home on the upper end of Malana village in the northern Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. Malana has become one of the world's top stoner destinations, and a symbolical battleground for India's fight against 'charas,' the black and sticky hashish that has made the village famous. "They want us to completely stop growing marijuana. But we keep sowing it," Ram said. "If the government helped us in some way and protected us from hunger and cold, we would maybe consider stopping. Obviously, we are not going to go hungry. Even if we have to go to jail for it, so be it." (AP Photo/Rishabh R. Jain)

    MALANA, India (AP) — For hundreds of years, the tiny village was just a speck lost amid the grandiose mountains of the Indian Himalayas.