• Correction: Immigration-Family Detention story

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — In a story Aug. 29 about a federal appeals court upholding a ruling that would send 28 detained immigrant mothers and their children back to their home countries, The Associated Press reported erroneously that some of the women seeking asylum were from Ecuador. The women were from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, not Ecuador.

  • This photo released by the the Mass Graves Directorate of the Kurdish Regional Government shows a skeleton exhumed from a mass grave containing Yazidis killed by Islamic State militants in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq. An analysis by The Associated Press has found 72 mass graves left behind by Islamic State extremists in Iraq and Syria, and many more are expected to be discovered as the group loses territory.  (Kurdish Mass Graves Directorate via AP)

    AP documents 72 mass graves found so far from IS territory

    HARDAN, Iraq (AP) — Peering through binoculars, the young man watched as Islamic State extremists gunned down the handcuffed men and then buried them with a waiting bulldozer. For six days he watched as IS filled one grave after another with his friends and neighbors.

  • This image released by the the Mass Graves Directorate of the Kurdish Regional Government shows a human skull in a mass grave containing Yazidis killed by Islamic State militants in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq in May, 2015. An analysis by The Associated Press has found 72 mass graves left behind by Islamic State extremists in Iraq and Syria, and many more are expected to be discovered as the group loses territory. (Kurdish Mass Graves Directorate via AP)

    IS buried thousands in 72 mass graves, AP finds

    HARDAN, Iraq (AP) — Surrounded by smoke and flames, the sound of gunshots echoing around him, the young man crouched in the creek for hours, listening to the men in his family die.

  • FILE- In this Aug. 15, 2016 file photo, hundreds of members of India's low-caste Dalit community gather for a rally in Una, Gujarat state, India as they protest after four men belonging to the Dalit community were beaten while trying to skin a dead cow in western India. The brutal beating of four men from the lowest rung of India's caste hierarchy, attacked for skinning a dead cow, has highlighted the persisting power of caste, 65 years after caste prejudice was banned in India. Dalits _ as "untouchables" are now called _ are increasingly signaling that they will no longer tolerate such bigotry, with an emerging class of educated and empowered young Dalits refusing to be cowed by the centuries-old discrimination, triggering deadly violence. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki, File)

    India’s angry Dalits rise against age-old caste prejudices

    NEW DELHI (AP) — The video footage posted on social media by India’s self-proclaimed cow saviors was brutal. It showed four bare-chested men tied with ropes to a car, flinching as an angry group of men took turns beating them with wooden sticks, belts and iron rods. Their crime: skinning a dead cow.

  • San Francisco 49ers quarterbacks Colin Kaepernick, left, and Blaine Gabbert stand on the sideline during the second half of an NFL preseason football game against the Green Bay Packers on Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, in Santa Clara, Calif. Green Bay won 21-10. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

    Kaepernick’s decision to sit through anthem scrutinized

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — From the White House to San Francisco police union headquarters, Colin Kaepernick’s name came up Monday as his decision to sit down during the national anthem reached far beyond football.

  • Correction: Topless Women story

    HAMPTON, N.H. (AP) — In a story Aug. 28 about topless demonstrations, The Associated Press misspelled the name of the president of GoTopless. She is Nadine Gary, not Nadine Gray.

  • Probe opens into French restaurateur’s anti-Muslim tirade

    PARIS (AP) — A French prosecutor has opened an investigation into suspected racial discrimination after two Muslim women said they were ordered out of a restaurant amid tension over France’s burkinis controversy.

  • The Rev. James W. Goolsby, Jr., senior pastor of the First Baptist Church, left, and the Rev. Scott Dickison, senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Christ, right, pose for a photo at Dickison's church in Macon, Ga., on Monday, July 11, 2016. There are two First Baptist Churches in Macon _ one black and one white. Two years ago, Dickison and Goolsby met to try to find a way the congregations, neighbors for so long, could become friends. They’d try to bridge the stubborn divide of race. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

    Neighbor churches, split on race lines, work to heal divide

    MACON, Ga. (AP) — There are two First Baptist Churches in Macon — one black and one white. They sit almost back-to-back, separated by a small park, in a hilltop historic district overlooking downtown.

  • Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike speaks during an interview with The Associated Press at her office in Tokyo, Monday, Aug. 29, 2016. Tokyo's first female leader says she will use her platform to host a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly 2020 Olympics and push a women's rights agenda that she hopes will be a model for Japan's central government. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    AP Interview: Tokyo leader vows Olympics, policy leadership

    TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo’s first female governor said Monday she will use her platform to host a cost-efficient and environmentally friendly 2020 Olympics and push a women’s rights agenda that she hopes will be a model for Japan’s central government.

  • In this photo taken on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, Indira Adhikari, left, and Suman Adhikari are seen at their home in Kathmandu, Nepal. The mother and son have very little hope of getting justice for Muktinath Adhikari, who was dragged out of a classroom he was teaching, tied to a tree and riddled with bullets by alleged maoists for refusing to part with a portion of his salary to fuel their rebellion. Now the very same rebels are politicians controlling the nation's government and want everyone to forgive and forget what happened during the conflict. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Survivors of Nepal insurgency fear crimes will go unpunished

    KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — The image of the teacher’s body tied to a tree and riddled with bullets still haunts his son 14 years later. Communist militants allegedly dragged the Nepalese man from the class he was teaching and then killed him for refusing to give part of his salary to fund their bloody rebellion.