• Merkel is last of Obama’s key European allies still standing

    In this April 25, 2016 file photo British Prime Minister David Cameron, U.S. President Barack Obama,  German Chancellor Angela Merkel,  French President Francois Hollande, and Italy's Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, clockwise from left, start their G-5 meeting in Herrenhaus Palace in Hannover, northern Germany. Just a few months ago, German Chancellor Angela Merkel brought together the leaders of the U.S., Britain, France and Italy to discuss the world’s crises, a moment captured in a photo of the five seated around a conference table. When she hosts a summit of 20 leading global powers in July, she will be the only one of those leaders left _ and the policies her partners worked for may have been reversed.(Michael Kappeler/ File pool photo via AP)

    BERLIN (AP) — Just a few months ago, German Chancellor Angela Merkel brought together the leaders of the U.S., Britain, France and Italy to discuss the world’s crises, a moment captured in a photo of the five seated around a conference table. When she hosts a summit of 20 leading global powers in July, she will be the only one of them left — and many of the policies her partners worked for might be reversed.

  • South Korea’s Park would leave economy mired in challenges

    Lee Jae-yong, a vice chairman of Samsung Electronics Co. arrives for hearing at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. South Korea's most powerful business leaders from Samsung, Hyundai Motor and six other companies face grilling as lawmakers probe their links to a corruption scandal involving South Korea's president and her confidante. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The heir to the Samsung empire and other tycoons took a public drubbing by lawmakers Tuesday over deep-rooted ties between politics and business that helped drive South Korea’s economic ascent but are central to its political crisis.

  • Stopgap spending bill to be unveiled as Congress finishes up

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks to the media after the Republican policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. From left are, Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., McConnell, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republicans on Tuesday unveiled a stopgap spending bill that would also expedite the likely confirmation of President-elect Donald Trump’s pick for defense secretary next year.

    Updated: 8:48 pm

  • Trump’s Taiwan call, tweets point to flashpoints with China

    In this combination of three 2016 file photos shows, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, left, speaking at a ceremony at the Gen. Andres Rodriguez school in Asuncion, Paraguay, on June 29, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, center, talking with President Barack Obama at White House in Washington, U.S.A. on Nov. 10, and China's President Xi Jinping arriving at La Moneda presidential palace in Santiago, Chile, on Nov. 22. With Trump's latest tweets touching on sensitive issues, China must decide how to handle an incoming American president who relishes confrontation and whose online statements appear to foreshadow shifts in foreign policy. China awoke Monday, Dec. 5, to criticism from Trump on Twitter, days after it responded to his telephone conversation with Taiwan's president by accusing the Taiwanese of playing a "little trick" on Trump. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz, Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Luis Hidalgo, Files)

    BEIJING (AP) — Donald Trump’s unprecedented phone conversation with Taiwan’s president and tweets criticizing China point to the possibility of major friction between the world’s two largest economies.

  • Trump threatens payback for US companies that move abroad

    President-elect Donald Trump gestures toward reporters as he arrives for a party at the home of Robert Mercer, one of his biggest campaign donors, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, in Head of the Harbor, N.Y. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump is threatening to impose heavy taxes on U.S. companies that move jobs overseas and still try to sell their products to Americans.

  • Trump’s call inspires hope in Taiwan, concern in Beijing

    This combination of two photos shows U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, left, speaking during a "USA Thank You" tour event in Cincinatti Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, and Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, delivering a speech during National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. Trump spoke Friday, Dec. 2, with Tsai, a move that will be sure to anger China. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Chinag Ying-ying, File)

    TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — With a 10-minute phone call and two tweets, Donald Trump inspired banner headlines and renewed hopes across Taiwan for a stronger partnership with the United States, while also inflaming the complex relationships between the U.S., mainland China, and the self-governing island China regards as a renegade province.

  • Timeline of China-Taiwan relations

    In this Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 photo released by Taiwan Presidential Office Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks with U.S. President-elect Donald Trump through a speaker phone in Taipei, Taiwan. (Taiwan Presidential Office via AP)

    BEIJING (AP) — China and Taiwan have been separately ruled since the Chinese civil war of the 1940s, but China claims sovereignty over the island and insists the two sides eventually unify. The status of Taiwan became an issue this weekend after President-elect Donald Trump broke with long-standing tradition and directly spoke with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen, drawing an irritated response from China.

  • For now, Trump bears signs of a dealmaker, not a policymaker

    President-elect Donald Trump reacts after speaking at Carrier Corp Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — He phones. He kibitzes. He cajoles. He threatens. He rewards.

  • Job deals like Carrier’s often fall short of political hype

    President-elect Donald Trump talks with workers during a visit to the Carrier factory, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, in Indianapolis, Ind. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — When President-elect Donald Trump announced a deal to save hundreds of jobs at a Carrier plant in Indiana, it came with a cost to state taxpayers of about $7 million in tax breaks and grants.

  • US employers add 178K jobs as unemployment sinks to 4.6 pct.

    In this Wednesday Nov. 2, 2016, file photo, job seekers attend a New York Department of Citywide Administrative Services job fair, in New York. On Friday, Dec. 2, 2016, the U.S. government issues the November jobs report. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a solid 178,000 jobs in November, reflecting the steady economy President-elect Donald Trump will inherit. The unemployment rate hit a nine-year low of 4.6 percent, though mainly because many people stopped looking for jobs and were no longer counted as unemployed.