• In this photo taken Monday, July 27, 2015, Bob Donegan, president of Ivar’s Seafood Restaurants, stands below a Native American artwork in one of the company's restaurants in Seattle. After Seattle's new minimum wage law took effect last April 1, Ivar’s announced that it was jacking up its prices by about 21 percent, eliminating tipping as a routine procedure, and immediately paying all its hourly workers a $15 per hour. They began the new pay rate three years earlier than the law required. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Higher wages a surprising success for Seattle restaurant

    SEATTLE (AP) — Menu prices are up 21 percent and you don’t have to tip at Ivar’s Salmon House on Seattle’s Lake Union after the restaurant decided to institute the city’s $15-an-hour minimum wage two years ahead of schedule.

  • In this Feb. 5, 2015, file photo, people hold up placards in Boston, against the Olympic Games coming to the city, during the first public forum regarding the city's 2024 Olympic bid. Boston’s bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics flamed out in spectacular fashion earlier this week, with local organizers and the U.S. Olympic Committee deciding to part ways after the Boston mayor and the Massachusetts governor refused to be rushed into a decision putting taxpayers on the hook if the games went over budget. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

    Questions remain after Boston’s Olympics bid ends

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston’s bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics flamed out in spectacular fashion this week, with local organizers and the U.S. Olympic Committee deciding to part ways after the mayor and Massachusetts’ governor refused to be rushed into a decision putting taxpayers on the hook if the games went over budget.

  • Fearful of being left out to dry, bond funds hold more cash

    NEW YORK (AP) — Imagine the bond market as a crowded swimming pool, except it’s one where the water level drops whenever someone tries to leave. By the time you attempt to get out, you’re stuck at the bottom, unable to exit because the ladder is 10 feet above your head.

  • Appeals court rules against online gambling firm’s founder

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — A federal appeals court has rejected attempts by the founder of a former online betting site to avoid paying $36 million in delinquent taxes and penalties, dismissing claims that his plea deal in a related criminal case precluded the government from pursuing the debt.

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015, a man welds parts in fans for industrial ventilation systems at the Robinson Fans Inc. plant in Harmony, Pa. The Commerce Department releases second-quarter gross domestic product on Thursday, July 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    US economy likely rebounded to solid growth rate in spring

    WASHINGTON (AP) — After a terrible winter, the economy is improving, with a solid rebound in the spring expected to be followed by stronger growth in the second half of the year.

  • This July 6, 2015 photo shows a Wall Street sign near the New York Stock Exchange. Most major global markets rose Thursday, July 30, 2015, after the U.S. Federal Reserve left interest rates unchanged at a record low, corporate earnings mostly did better than expected and investors awaited U.S. economic growth figures. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Asian stocks higher after Fed leaves rates unchanged

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are opening lower as investors respond to some disappointing results from U.S. companies.

  • In this July 16, 2015, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal Reserve policymakers meet Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to set interest rates and release a statement. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Takeaway from Fed meeting: Expect a rate increase this year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Expectations have grown that sometime this year, the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates from record lows. The only question seems to be when.

  • Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., center, talks with committee members Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 29, 2015, prior to the committee's hearing on the impacts of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on U.S. Interests and the Military Balance in the Middle East. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Lawmakers poised to leave town with lots of work left undone

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The House voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to shore up federal highway aid and veterans’ health care before heading out of town for its August recess, leaving unresolved an array of sticky issues that are sure to complicate an autumn agenda already groaning under the weight of indecision.

  • Trader James Denaro, center, works with specialist Michael O'Connor, right, at the post that handles Yelp, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Yelp plunged 28 percent after sinking to a loss and cutting its outlook. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Stocks end higher after Fed keeps interest rates unchanged

    BEIJING (AP) — Chinese stocks held steady Thursday following this week’s turbulence while other Asian markets were mixed after the U.S. Federal Reserve left interest rates unchanged at a record low.

  • In this July 16, 2015, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal Reserve policymakers meet Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to set interest rates and release a statement. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Fed holds steady on rates, seeks further economic gains

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve appears on track to raise interest rates later this year but signaled Wednesday that it wants to see further economic gains and higher inflation before doing so.