• Insurance regulator wants more time to pursue back taxes

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico’s superintendent of insurance pleaded Wednesday for more time to recover unpaid taxes on insurance premiums and investigate at least one company, after an outside audit uncovered $193 million in uncollected state revenue.

  • New Mexico high court to settle dispute over pollution rules

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Environmentalists say New Mexico isn’t going far enough to protect the state’s limited groundwater supplies from copper mining operations.

  • Editorial Roundup: Excerpts from recent editorials

    Excerpts from recent editorials in the United States and abroad:

  • The Latest: New Mexico regulators approve PNM rate hike

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Latest on Public Service Co. of New Mexico’s rate increase (all times local):

  • Spending soars on medication at New Mexico state agencies

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Spending on prescription medication by New Mexico state agencies is rising quickly as insurance coverage expands under Medicaid and demands for specialty drugs are met for everyone from prison inmates to retired state workers, a new study by the state Legislature has found.

  • Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen takes her seat on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, before the House Financial Services Committee hearing. Yellen is likely to face sharp questions from a House committee today over whether there was a failure in oversight by federal banking regulators involving Wells Fargo. The nation's second largest bank engaged in practices that allegedly allowed the bank to open millions of accounts without customers' permission. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Yellen says rate hike likely appropriate this year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday that the central bank has no “fixed timetable” for raising interest rates but she believes the economy is ready for a rate hike by the end of the year.

  • In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Melbourne, Fla. While Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs, if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him. (AP Photo/John Locher)

    Trump turned over tax returns _ for lawsuits, loans, casinos

    WASHINGTON (AP) — While Donald Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs — if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.

  • In this Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, file photo, trader Leon Montana works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. stock markets opened slightly higher Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016, as energy companies are rising with the price of oil. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    US stocks give up an early gain and turn lower at midday

    HONG KONG (AP) — Energy companies led a rally in Asian stock markets Thursday as investors welcomed news that OPEC nations planned to cut oil production for the first time in eight years in an effort to reduce a global glut.

  • In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally in Melbourne, Fla. While Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs, if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him. (AP Photo/John Locher)

    Trump has turned over tax returns _ for lawsuits and loans

    WASHINGTON (AP) — While Donald Trump won’t publicly release his income tax returns, the New York businessman has turned them over when it suited his needs — if he stood to make a profit, needed a loan or when a judge forced him.

  • House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, following a closed-door meeting of House Republicans. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Deal reached to keep US government running, help Flint

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Averting an election-year crisis, Congress late Wednesday sent President Barack Obama a bill to keep the government operating through Dec. 9 and provide $1.1 billion in long-delayed funding to battle the Zika virus.