• Spread by trade and climate, bugs butcher America’s forests

    In this Oct. 5, 2016 photo, distressed and dying hemlock trees are seen at Harvard University's research forest in Petersham, Mass. Forests from New England to the West Coast are jeopardized by invasive pests that defoliate and kill trees. Scientists said the pests are driving some tree species toward extinction and causing billions of dollars a year in damage. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    PETERSHAM, Mass. (AP) — In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

  • Rare weasel species makes a comeback in Washington state

    In this Friday, Dec. 2, 2016, photo, a Pacific fisher takes off running after being released into a forest at Mount Rainier National Park, Wash. Pacific fishers, forest-dwelling weasel-like mammals whose numbers have declined in the West Coast over the decades, are slowly making a comeback in Washington state. The fisher was among 10 captured days earlier in British Columbia, and then released Friday as part of a multi-year effort to restore them to their historic range. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK, Wash. (AP) — The elusive weasel-like mammal poked its head out of the wooden crate, glanced around and quickly darted into the thick forest of Mount Rainier National Park — returning to a landscape where it had been missing for seven decades.