• Oppah Muchinguri, theZimbabwean  Minister of  Environment, Water and Climate addresses a  press conference in Harare, Zimbabwe, Friday, July, 31, 2015. Zimbabwe intends to seek the extradition of an American dentist who killed a lion that was lured out of a national park and shot with a bow and a gun, and the process has already begun, a Cabinet minister said Friday. "Unfortunately it was too late to apprehend the foreign poacher as he had already absconded to his country of origin," Oppah Muchinguri, Zimbabwe's environment, water and climate minister, told a news conference. "We are appealing to the responsible authorities for his extradition to Zimbabwe so that he be made accountable."  (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)

    Q&A on possible extradition for dentist who killed lion

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Zimbabwe has called for an American dentist who killed a lion that was lured out of a national park and caused international outrage to be extradited and face as-yet filed charges. But it isn’t clear whether Walter James Palmer, a 55-year-old from Minnesota, can be extradited or, if so, can fight having to go back to the African nation. Palmer has said he relied on his guides to ensure the hunt was legal.

  • In this Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, oil pump jacks work behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D. As drivers, shippers and airlines continue to enjoy lower fuel prices, the oil industry is wrestling with layoffs and losses. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

    Extended slump in oil taking toll on industry, economy

    NEW YORK (AP) — As drivers, shippers and airlines continue to enjoy lower fuel prices, the oil industry is responding to much lower profits with sharp cuts in spending and employment that are hurting economic growth.

  • In this July 16, 2015, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal Reserve policymakers meet Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to set interest rates and release a statement. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Takeaway from Fed meeting: Expect a rate increase this year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Expectations have grown that sometime this year, the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates from record lows. The only question seems to be when.

  • In this July 16, 2015, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal Reserve policymakers meet Wednesday, July 29, 2015, to set interest rates and release a statement. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Fed holds steady on rates, seeks further economic gains

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve appears on track to raise interest rates later this year but signaled Wednesday that it wants to see further economic gains and higher inflation before doing so.