• New Mexico not expected to fight EPA’s emission-cutting rule

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Environment Secretary Ryan Flynn says the state has properly prepared for President Barack Obama’s efforts to cut greenhouse gases from power plants.

  • President Barack Obama speaks about his Clean Power Plan, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in the East Room at the White House in Washington. The president is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Obama power plant rules spark 2016 fight over climate change

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama’s sweeping new power plant regulations are thrusting the divisive debate over climate change into the race for the White House, with candidates in both parties seeing an opportunity to capitalize.

  • President Barack Obama speaks about his Clean Power Plan, Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in the East Room at the White House in Washington. The president is mandating even steeper greenhouse gas cuts from U.S. power plants than previously expected, while granting states more time and broader options to comply. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Who wins and loses under Obama’s stricter power plant limits

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama sought to clamp down Monday on power plant emissions with a federal plan that — if successful — would attempt to slow global warming by dramatically shifting the way Americans get and use electricity.

    Updated: 4:26 pm

  • Sunday, August 2, 2015

    Who wins and loses under Obama’s stricter greenhouse gas emission limits for power plants

  • In this Jan. 20, 2015 file photo, a plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H.  President Barack Obama on Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, will unveil the final version of his unprecedented regulations clamping down on carbon dioxide emissions from existing U.S. power plants. The Obama administration first proposed the rule last year. Opponents plan to sue immediately to stop the rule's implementation. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

    Obama to mandate steeper emissions cuts from US power plants

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Aiming to jolt the rest of the world to action, President Barack Obama moved ahead Sunday with even tougher greenhouse gas cuts on American power plants, setting up a certain confrontation in the courts with energy producers and Republican-led states.

  • In this Jan. 20, 2015 file photo, a plume of steam billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H.  President Barack Obama on Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, will unveil the final version of his unprecedented regulations clamping down on carbon dioxide emissions from existing U.S. power plants. The Obama administration first proposed the rule last year. Opponents plan to sue immediately to stop the rule's implementation. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

    Obama to unveil final power plant emissions limits on Monday

    NEW YORK (AP) — President Barack Obama will impose even steeper cuts on greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. power plants than previously expected, senior administration officials said Sunday, in what the president called the most significant step the U.S. has ever taken to fight global warming.

  • In this image takem from a November 2012 video made available by Paula French, a well-known, protected lion known as Cecil strolls around in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe's wildlife minister says extradition is being sought for Walter Palmer, the American dentist who killed a Cecil.  (Paula French via AP)

    Zimbabwean authorities restrict hunting after lion killing

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe has suspended the hunting of lions, leopards and elephants in an area where a lion popular with tourists was killed, and is investigating the killing of another lion in April that may have been illegal, the country’s wildlife authority said Saturday.

  • Tokyo 2020 Olympics President Yoshiro Mori speaks at the 128th International Olympic Committee session in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015. A day after the high-profile vote which awarded Beijing the 2022 Winter Games, International Olympic Committee members got down to the more mundane business of providing updates on games they’d already assigned. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

    IOC hears reports on Rio’s dirty water, Tokyo emblem flap

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — A day after the high-profile vote which awarded Beijing the 2022 Winter Games, International Olympic Committee members dealt Saturday with issues affecting the next two Summer Games — severe water pollution in Rio de Janeiro and the fuss over Tokyo’s choice of emblem.

  • China's Vice Premier Liu Yandong, center, celebrates with Beijing Mayor and Beijing 2022 Olympic Winter Games Bid President Wang Anshun, left, and Liu Peng, right, Minister of the General Administration of Sport of China, after Beijing was awarded the 2022 Winter Olympic Games, defeating Almaty in the final round of voting, at IOC meeting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Friday, July 31, 2015. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian, Pool)

    Having made Olympic history, Beijing faces challenges

    BEIJING (AP) — Having made history as the first city to win hosting rights for both the Summer and Winter Olympics, Beijing now faces a slew of challenges, from ensuring adequate snow in a bone-dry region to ramping up support for winter sports in a nation where few people ski or skate.

  • Paratriathlete stands on the shore of the Copacabana Beach during a training session, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, July 31, 2015. The Brazilian government's data on water pollution in Rio de Janeiro show water near where triathletes are preparing to compete this weekend is "unfit" for swimming. The most recent pollution reading at Copacabana was taken from a sample this past Monday. An Olympic qualifier and Paratriathlon event begins Saturday, and several athletes were already getting into the water Friday morning. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    For athletes, Olympic goals outweigh the risks of Rio waters

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Athletes have been dismissing the dangers of swimming in Rio de Janeiro’s dirty waters, saying the risks are not great enough to alter their Olympic plans.