• Correction: Zimbabwe-Lion Killed-3 Things story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story July 29 about U.S. regulations and big game hunting, The Associated Press erroneously referred to The Human Society of the United States. It is The Humane Society of the United States.

  • In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone. (Andy Loveridge/Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP)

    Minnesota man who killed lion keeps low profile amid outrage

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe prosecutors Thursday are still trying to figure out how to charge one of the suspects in the killing of Cecil the lion by an American dentist that has outraged animal lovers.

  • In this July 14, 2015 photo, beachgoers wade into the waters of Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An Associated Press analysis of water quality found not one water venue safe for swimming or boating in Rio's waters. Over 10,000 athletes from 205 countries are expected to compete in next year's Summer Olympics. Hundreds of them will be sailing in the waters near Marina da Gloria in Guanabara Bay; swimming off Copacabana Beach; and canoeing and rowing on the brackish waters of the Rodrigo de Freitas Lake. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

    AP Investigation: Dirty Rio water a threat at 2016 Olympics

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The waters where Olympians will compete in swimming and boating events next summer in South America’s first games are rife with human sewage and present a serious health risk for athletes, an Associated Press investigation has found.

  • A woman writes on a sign outside Dr. Walter James Palmer's dental office in Bloomington, Minn., Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Palmer reportedly paid $50,000 to track and kill a black-maned lion, just outside Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)

    Minnesota dentist rarely discussed hunting with patients

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A Minnesota dentist who has become the target of worldwide outrage for hunting and killing a protected lion in Zimbabwe advised patients Wednesday to seek care elsewhere and said he rarely discussed his big-game hunting because it can be a “divisive and emotionally charged topic.”