• Thursday, July 30, 2015

    Clinton releases tax, health records on busy Friday — physically ‘fit to serve as president’

    Updated: 9:00 pm

  • In this April 28, 2015 photo, Fernando Spilki, virologist and coordinator of the environmental quality program at Feevale University, holds up a water sample, backdropped by the Marina da Gloria, Zone 2, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Spilki said the tests he conducted for the Associated Press so far show that Rio's waters "are chronically contaminated." (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    AP Investigation: What’s in Rio’s water? AP explains tests

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Sewage pollution has long been a problem for Rio de Janeiro, and officials promised they would use the 2016 Summer Olympics as the springboard to finally clean up this stunningly beautiful city’s waterways.

  • In this April 28, 2015 photo, Fernando Spilki, virologist and coordinator of the environmental quality program at Feevale University, holds up a water sample, backdropped by the Marina da Gloria, Zone 2, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Spilki said the tests he conducted for the Associated Press so far show that Rio's waters "are chronically contaminated." (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    5 things to know about filthy water awaiting Rio Olympians

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Associated Press commissioned a study of the virus and bacteria levels in the waters where Olympic athletes will compete next year in Rio de Janeiro. The testing found dangerously high levels of pathogens from human sewage waste.

  • Correction: Zimbabwe-Lion Killed-3 Things story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story July 29 about U.S. regulations and big game hunting, The Associated Press erroneously referred to The Human Society of the United States. It is The Humane Society of the United States.

  • In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone. (Andy Loveridge/Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP)

    For some, hunting lions in Africa is the ultimate experience

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — It is, for some well-heeled foreign visitors, the ultimate African experience: the thrill of hunting a lion, one of the “Big Five” animals whose habitats are under increasing pressure from human encroachment. Now an American dentist’s killing of a celebrity lion in Zimbabwe has triggered global revulsion, highlighting what critics say is an industry of trophy hunting that threatens vulnerable species across sub-Saharan Africa.

  • In this undated photo provided by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Cecil the lion rests in Hwange National Park, in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Two Zimbabweans arrested for illegally hunting a lion appeared in court Wednesday, July 29, 2015. The head of Zimbabwe’s safari association said the killing was unethical and that it couldn’t even be classified as a hunt, since the lion killed by an American dentist was lured into the kill zone. (Andy Loveridge/Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP)

    Minnesota man who killed lion keeps low profile amid outrage

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe prosecutors Thursday are still trying to figure out how to charge one of the suspects in the killing of Cecil the lion by an American dentist that has outraged animal lovers.

  • This July 27, 2015 aerial photo, shows Marina da Gloria in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Construction is underway on a project to cap a pipe that long spewed raw sewage into the marina, the starting place for the Olympic sailing events. Yet Associated Press testing of the marina's water quality found it laden with sewage viruses. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

    AP Investigation: Olympic teams to swim, boat in Rio’s filth

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Athletes in next year’s Summer Olympics here will be swimming and boating in waters so contaminated with human feces that they risk becoming violently ill and unable to compete in the games, an Associated Press investigation has found.

  • In this July 14, 2015 photo, beachgoers wade into the waters of Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An Associated Press analysis of water quality found not one water venue safe for swimming or boating in Rio's waters. Over 10,000 athletes from 205 countries are expected to compete in next year's Summer Olympics. Hundreds of them will be sailing in the waters near Marina da Gloria in Guanabara Bay; swimming off Copacabana Beach; and canoeing and rowing on the brackish waters of the Rodrigo de Freitas Lake. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

    AP Investigation: Dirty Rio water a threat at 2016 Olympics

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The waters where Olympians will compete in swimming and boating events next summer in South America’s first games are rife with human sewage and present a serious health risk for athletes, an Associated Press investigation has found.

  • A woman writes on a sign outside Dr. Walter James Palmer's dental office in Bloomington, Minn., Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Palmer reportedly paid $50,000 to track and kill a black-maned lion, just outside Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)

    Minnesota dentist rarely discussed hunting with patients

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A Minnesota dentist who has become the target of worldwide outrage for hunting and killing a protected lion in Zimbabwe advised patients Wednesday to seek care elsewhere and said he rarely discussed his big-game hunting because it can be a “divisive and emotionally charged topic.”

  • In this Feb. 1, 2010 file photo, 0 percent financing for 72 months is advertised on a GMC Sierra pickup truck at a dealership in Center Line, Mich. When a car dealer offers to loan you the money to buy a car at zero interest, it gets your attention. Yet that cheap money might not be the best deal you can get. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

    Zero-percent financing turns heads, but may not be best deal

    DETROIT (AP) — When a car dealer offers to loan you the money to buy a car at zero interest, it gets your attention. Yet that cheap money might not be the best deal you can get.