• Dow reaches record as rising oil pulls stocks mostly higher

    In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, file photo, the American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. More gains in Goldman Sachs and Chevron helped pull the Dow Jones industrial average to another record high even as other indexes were flat to lower in early trading Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016.  (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    NEW YORK (AP) — Technology companies plunged Thursday, and high-dividend stocks also took hefty losses as bond yields rose to their highest level in more than a year. But more big gains for blue-chip banking and oil stocks pulled the Dow Jones industrial average to a record high.

  • US consumers should feel muted impact from rising oil price

    In this Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, file photo, Leon Balagula changes the price for the gasoline at his Sunoco station in the early morning, in Fort Lee, N.J. OPEC’s decision on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, to cut production gave an immediate boost to oil prices, but the impact on consumers is likely to be more modest and gradual. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

    DALLAS (AP) — OPEC’s decision to cut production gave an immediate boost to oil prices, but the impact on consumers and the U.S. economy is likely to be more modest and gradual.

  • Trump Commerce pick found profits, controversy in Rust Belt

    Billionaire investor Wilbur Ross talks with reporters in the lobby of Trump Tower, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Wilbur Ross, Donald Trump’s choice for Commerce secretary, has a history of salvaging failing ventures — including, at one point, Trump’s own.

  • Major indexes set records as energy companies surge

    This July 15, 2013, file photo, shows the New York Stock Exchange. Oil prices surged Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, on expectations of a production cut from the OPEC cartel of producers. Shares in oil companies rose in the slipstream of higher oil prices, helping indexes around the world to post solid gains. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks moved mostly lower Wednesday as gains in blue-chip energy companies and banks were not enough to make up for losses in the broader market.

  • US officials will review status of lesser prairie chicken

    FILE- In this April 7, 1999, file photo, a male lesser prairie chicken climbs a sage limb to rise above the others at a breeding area near Follett, Texas. The lesser prairie chicken was removed from the threatened and endangered species list earlier this year following court rulings in Texas and a decision by government lawyers not to pursue an appeal. However, federal wildlife officials on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, agreed to reconsider the status of a grouse found in pockets across the Great Plains as environmentalists fight to return the bird to the list of protected species. (David Crenshaw  /Tulsa World via AP, File)

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal wildlife officials on Tuesday agreed to reconsider the status of a grouse found in pockets across the Great Plains as environmentalists fight to return the bird to the list of protected species.

  • Pipeline protest arrests strain North Dakota’s court system

    In this photo provided by Nancy Trevino, protesters against the Dakota Access oil pipeline gather at and around a hill, referred to as Turtle Island, where demonstrators claim burial sites are located, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2016 in Cannon Ball, N.D. The hill is across a body of water from where hundreds and times thousands of people have camped out for months to protest the construction of the four-state pipeline. (Nancy Trevino via AP)

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The hundreds of arrests during the months of protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota have created an unprecedented burden for the state’s court system, which faces huge cost overruns and doesn’t have enough judges, lawyers and clerks to handle the workload.

  • Energy companies drag US stocks lower as oil prices plunge

    In this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo, an American flag flies in front of the New York Stock Exchange in New York. U.S. stocks started slightly lower early Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, as the price of oil tumbled almost 4 percent. That took energy companies sharply lower. Health care companies climbed after a strong outlook from UnitedHealth Group. Tiffany jumped after it reported better quarterly results than analysts expected. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    TOKYO (AP) — Asian stocks were mixed Wednesday, as investors awaited the results of a key meeting of oil producing nations.

  • Orders could have little effect on pipeline protest camp

    Sarah Talley,19, poses for a portrait during a small gathering, in which people prayed for the Dakota Access oil pipeline protesters in Cannon Ball, ND., on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016 at Ingress Yugen, a spiritual resource center, in Flint, Mich. "I think it's important for people in Standing Rock and in Flint to kind of acknowledge each other because we're fighting the same fight, just in different way," said Talley. (Callaghan O'Hare/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Government orders for protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline to leave federal land could have little immediate effect on the encampment where scores of people have been gathered for months to oppose the $3.8 billion project.

  • The Latest: Governor orders evacuation of protest camp

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Latest on the protest against the Dakota Access oil pipeline (all times local):

  • Order could have little effect on pipeline protest camp

    Sarah Talley,19, poses for a portrait during a small gathering, in which people prayed for the Dakota Access oil pipeline protesters in Cannon Ball, ND., on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016 at Ingress Yugen, a spiritual resource center, in Flint, Mich. "I think it's important for people in Standing Rock and in Flint to kind of acknowledge each other because we're fighting the same fight, just in different way," said Talley. (Callaghan O'Hare/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Government orders for protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline to leave federal land could have little immediate effect on the encampment where scores of people have been gathered for months to oppose the $3.8 billion project.