• Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Each morning, Joanna Smith’s 7-year-old son pulls on a T-shirt and shorts, boasts how fast he can tie his sneakers and heads to school. An honor-roll student who loves science and spelling, he often stays after class to run on the playground with his large group of friends.

  • The Latest: New Mexico judge defers judgment on education

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Latest on a legal challenge against New Mexico’s educational system (all times local):

  • Title IX investigation into sexual assault allegations ends

    EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan State officials say they have concluded a Title IX investigation into an alleged sexual assault and haven’t taken any action to remove three football players from the university.

  • Virginia Tech has fired baseball coach Patrick Mason

    BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP) — Virginia Tech has fired baseball coach Patrick Mason after four seasons.

  • New Mexico case centers on funding, classroom opportunities

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Center on Law and Poverty and other advocates are asking a state judge to declare that New Mexico’s education system is failing to meet its constitutional responsibilities for Native American students, low-income students and those learning English as a second language.

  • Texas bathroom bill could expose secrets of transgender kids

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — In a story May 22 about students potentially being exposed as transgender to their classmates, The Associated Press erroneously referred to Anna Eastman as the president of the Houston school district’s board of trustees. She is a member of the board, but is no longer its president.

  • New Mexico budget woes bring national teachers union leader

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The national president of the American Federation of Teachers is coming to New Mexico amid the state’s budget woes.

  • Fighting back: Students, some schools take on sexual assault

    FOREST GROVE, Ore. (AP) — A pair of Oregon school districts were intent on identifying warning signs that students might be contemplating a campus shooting when they stumbled on a threat far more pervasive yet much less discussed — sexual aggression among classmates.