• USC football player accused of rape appears in Utah court

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A suspended University of Southern California football player charged with rape in Utah and facing allegations involving the same woman in California was ordered Friday not to contact the alleged victim.

  • The painting Congregation Leaving The Reformed Church of Nuenen by Vincent Van Gogh, is shown during a press conference in Naples, Italy, Friday, Sept. 30 2016. This painting and another one, Seascape at Scheveningen, which had been stolen in an Amsterdam museum in 2002, were recovered by Naples investigators among the assets of a Camorra group. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)

    2 Van Gogh paintings recovered by Italian anti-Mafia police

    ROME (AP) — Italian police have found two Van Gogh paintings that were stolen from an Amsterdam museum in 2002 hidden in a farmhouse near an organized crime syndicate’s Naples-area stronghold, investigators said Friday.

  • State Police: Dead woman is found at a residence in Nambe

    NAMBE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico State Police say they’re investigating the death of a woman whose body was found at a residence in Nambe.

  • Wilbert Paulissen of the Joint Investigation Team (JIT) speaks on the preliminary results of the investigation into the shooting-down of Malaysia Airlines jetliner flight MH17 during a press conference in Nieuwegein, Netherlands, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. The disaster claimed 298 lives. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

    The Latest: US backs report that Russian missile downed MH17

    NIEUWEGEIN, Netherlands (AP) — The Latest on the probe into the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine in 2014 (all times local):

  • Wilbert Paulissen of the Joint Investigation Team (JIT) speaks on the preliminary results of the investigation into the shooting-down of Malaysia Airlines jetliner flight MH17 during a press conference in Nieuwegein, Netherlands, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. The disaster claimed 298 lives. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

    The Latest: US backs report that Russian missile downed MH17

    NIEUWEGEIN, Netherlands (AP) — The Latest on the probe into the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine in 2014 (all times local):

  • Deb Roschen goes through notebooks of evidence of how authorities accessed information about her through law enforcement databases, during an interview in Rochester, Minn., on July 11, 2016. The former county commissioner alleged in a 2013 lawsuit that law enforcement and government employees inappropriately ran repeated queries on her and other politicians over 10 years. The searches were in retaliation for questioning county spending and sheriff’s programs, she says. "Now there are people who do not like me that have all my private information ... any information that could be used against me. They could steal my identity, they could sell it to someone," Roschen said. "The sense of being vulnerable," she added, "there's no fix to that." (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

    A look at police abuse of confidential databases nationwide

    An Associated Press investigation found police officers across the country abuse sensitive law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons totally unrelated to police work. In the worst cases, officers have stalked, harassed and tampered with or sold information they obtained through criminal history and motor vehicle databases. Those resources give officers vital information about people they encounter on the job, but they can also be misused.

  • Members of the Joint Investigation Team (JIT) get to their feet after a press conference on the preliminary results of the investigation into the shooting-down of Malaysia Airlines jetliner flight MH17 in Nieuwegein, Netherlands, Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2016. The disaster claimed 298 lives. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

    Probe: Malaysian jet downed by missile launcher from Russia

    NIEUWEGEIN, Netherlands (AP) — An international criminal probe concluded that a missile which destroyed a Malaysian passenger jet over Ukraine in 2014 and killed all 298 people aboard was fired from rebel-controlled territory by a mobile launcher trucked in from Russia and hastily returned there.

  • In this image made from an Oct. 11, 2011 video made available by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Florida Highway Patrol Officer Donna Watts arrests Miami Police Department Officer Fausto Lopez who was traveling at 120 miles per hour to an off-duty job, in Hollywood, Fla. After the incident, Watts says that she was harassed with prank calls, threatening posts on law enforcement message boards and unfamiliar cars that idled near her home. In lawsuits, she accused dozens of officers of obtaining information about her in the state’s driver database. (Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles via AP)

    AP: Across US, police officers misuse confidential databases

    DENVER (AP) — Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons unrelated to police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.

  • In this image made from an Oct. 11, 2011 video made available by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Florida Highway Patrol Officer Donna Watts arrests Miami Police Department Officer Fausto Lopez who was traveling at 120 miles per hour to an off-duty job, in Hollywood, Fla. After the incident, Watts says that she was harassed with prank calls, threatening posts on law enforcement message boards and unfamiliar cars that idled near her home. In lawsuits, she accused dozens of officers of obtaining information about her in the state’s driver database. (Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles via AP)

    AP: Across US, police officers abuse confidential databases

    DENVER (AP) — Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found.