• Francisco Marquez chats with his mother Maria Luz Lara-Marquez at family home in Del Mar, California, Thursday, Oct. 201.2016. The 30-year-old dual U.S. citizen spoke of his four-month incarceration in his native Venezuela, two days after he was freed and boarded a flight to join his parents in Southern California. He was arrested in June while taking part in a nationwide recall campaign against President Nicolas Maduro and accused of trying to foment violence. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat)

    Venezuelan activist moves to US after release from ‘dungeon’

    DEL MAR, Calif. (AP) — Francisco Marquez says he constantly heard screams from prisoners being beaten in neighboring cells. He once saw a dozen inmates handcuffed, forced to run naked for hours under the hot sun as punishment for a failed escape attempt.

  • The president of one of the largest police organizations in the United States on Monday, OCT. 17, 2016, apologized for historical mistreatment of minorities, calling it a "dark side of our shared history" that must be acknowledged and overcome. Terrence Cunningham, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, said at the group's annual conference that police have historically been a face of oppression, enforcing laws that ensured legalized discrimination and denial of basic rights. He was not more specific. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat)

    Reactions are mixed to police leader’s apology

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — For some, the apology went too far. For others, it didn’t go far enough. For many, it was just right.