• In this Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, file photo, a just-cut stack of $100 bills rolls down the line at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Western Currency Facility in Fort Worth, Texas. Finding money you didn’t know you had is like discovering lost treasure. Nearly $42 billion in unclaimed property is sitting in state coffers, waiting to be matched with its owners or their heirs. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

    Are you owed money from a forgotten bank account?

    Finding money you didn’t know you had is like discovering lost treasure. For many people, there’s treasure to be found in old, forgotten bank accounts.

  • In a photo provided by William Sun, people examine the wreckage of a New Jersey Transit commuter train that crashed into the train station during the morning rush hour in Hoboken,, N.J., Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. The crash caused an unknown number of injuries and witnesses reported seeing one woman trapped under concrete and many people bleeding. (William Sun via AP)

    Train crashes into New Jersey station; more than 100 injured

    HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) — A rush hour commuter train crashed through a barrier at the busy Hoboken station and lurched across the waiting area Thursday morning, killing one person and injuring more than 100 others in a grisly wreck that renewed questions about whether long-delayed automated safety technology could have prevented tragedy.

  • In this Thursday, March 3, 2016, file photo, people work on a job search on a computer at an office in Atlanta. On Saturday, Oct. 1, 2016, the U.S. government plans to cede control of some of the internet’s core systems, namely, the directories that help web browsers and apps know where to find the latest weather, maps and Facebook musings. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: US ceding control of core Internet systems

    NEW YORK (AP) — On Saturday, the U.S. government plans to cede control of some of the internet’s core systems — namely, the directories that help web browsers and apps know where to find the latest weather, maps and Facebook musings.

  • This photo provided by Anthony Pidgeon, taken Aug. 21, 2015, shows the Asian-American band The Slants, from left, Joe X Jiang, Ken Shima, Tyler Chen, Simon "Young" Tam, Joe X Jiang in Old Town Chinatown, Portland, Ore. The Supreme Court will hear a First Amendment challenge over the government's refusal to register offensive trademarks in a case that could affect the Washington Redskins. The justices agreed Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, to take up a dispute involving an Asian-American rock band called the Slants, but did not act on a separate request to hear the higher-profile Redskins case at the same time. (Anthony Pidgeon/Redferns via AP)

    Supreme Court to hear challenge over offensive trademarks

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up a First Amendment clash over the government’s refusal to register offensive trademarks, a case that could affect the Washington Redskins in their legal fight over the team name.

  • Correction: Algeria-Oil Prices story

    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — In a story Sept. 29 about OPEC’s deal to curb oil production, The Associated Press misspelled the Algerian energy minister’s name. It is Noureddine Boutarfa, not Bouarfaa.

  • This aerial Friday, Sept. 16, 2016, file photo shows a sinkhole in Mulberry, Fla., that opened up underneath a gypsum stack at a Mosaic phosphate fertilizer plant. Florida Gov. Rick Scott has issued an emergency rule requiring public notification of pollution events within 24 hours, a move that comes after it took weeks to notify local residents about the fertilizer plant that leaked millions of gallons of contaminated water into a major aquifer, according to a news release Monday, Sept. 26. (Jim Damaske/Tampa Bay Times via AP, File)

    Neighbors anxious after Florida sinkhole contaminates water

    MULBERRY, Fla. (AP) — Neighbors of a huge sinkhole sending cascades of contaminated water and fertilizer plant waste into Florida’s main drinking-water aquifer are fearful and fuming that it took weeks for them to be notified about the disaster.

  • In this Sept. 26, 2016, photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton answers a question during the presidential debate with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Clinton has vowed to respond to foreign hacking the same as any other attack against the United States. She’s openly blamed Russia for recent U.S. cyber break-ins while Donald Trump wondered if overseas governments or overweight hackers at home were responsible. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

    Clinton vows to retaliate against foreign hackers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton is vowing anew to respond to foreign hacking the same as any other attack against the United States. When she openly blamed Russia for recent U.S. cyber break-ins, Donald Trump wondered whether to blame overseas governments or overweight hackers working from home.

  • House Financial Services Committee member Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., right, questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, during the committee's hearing investigating Wells Fargo's opening of unauthorized customer accounts. Fellow committee member Rep. Terry Sewell, D-Ala. is at left.  (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Wells Fargo CEO to face lawmakers with better defense

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Angry lawmakers heaped another round of blistering criticism on Wells Fargo’s CEO, pressing Thursday for details about what senior managers knew about allegedly illegal sales practices and when any concerns were disclosed.

  • Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike looks over a report during an expert panel at the Tokyo Metropolitan government office in Tokyo Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. The panel, launched by Koike raised concerns about ever-growing unofficial cost estimates and burden on the city and its taxpayers, warned that total cost for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic could exceed 3 trillion yen ($30 billion) unless they take drastic cost-cutting measures. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Expert panel warns Tokyo Olympics cost could top $30 billion

    TOKYO (AP) — The price tag of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics could exceed 3 trillion yen ($30 billion) unless drastic cost-cutting measures are taken and several key venues are relocated, an expert panel warned Thursday in the latest blow to Japanese organizers.

  • In this Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016 photo, a cadets walk out of the academic building at the New York Military Academy in Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. While Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, talks tough about dealing with China, his old military prep school is building bridges to that country. The New York Military Academy began classes this fall with new Chinese backing and a former New York City high school principal originally from China in charge. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

    Trump’s old military prep school looks overseas for renewal

    CORNWALL-ON-HUDSON, N.Y. (AP) — While Donald Trump talks tough about dealing with China, his old military prep school is building bridges to that country.