• In this April 13, 2014, file photo taken from the Royal New Zealand air force (RNZAF) P-3K2-Orion aircraft, co-pilot Squadron Leader Brett McKenzie looks out of a window while searching for debris from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, in the Indian Ocean off the coast of western Australia.  Even with the recent discovery of a possible wing fragment from the missing airplane on Wednesday, July 29, 2015,  on a remote island in the Indian Ocean, tracing the route of the debris back across Indian Ocean may prove impossible. (Greg Wood/Pool Photo via AP)

    Tracing back debris to find Flight 370 may prove impossible

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — If it’s confirmed that a wing fragment found on a remote island in the Indian Ocean is from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, lost more than 500 days ago, could scientists use their knowledge of ocean currents to trace back its path and pinpoint the bulk of the wreck?

  • Workers for an association responsible for maintaining paths to the beaches from being overgrown by shrubs, search the beach for possible additional airplane debris near the area where an airplane wing part was washed up, in the early morning near Saint-Andre on the north coast of the Indian Ocean island of Reunion Friday, July 31, 2015. A barnacle-encrusted wing part that washed up on the remote Indian Ocean island could help solve one of aviation's greatest mysteries, as investigators work to connect it to the Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that vanished more than a year ago with 293 people aboard. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

    US official: Plane debris in Indian Ocean same type as MH370

    SAINT-ANDRE, Reunion (AP) — Under a microscope and expert eyes, the wing fragment that washed up on the beach of this volcanic island could yield clues not just to its path through the Indian Ocean, but also to what happened to the airplane it belonged to.

    Updated: 6:04 pm