• IOC: Tokyo’s huge cost could give wrong message

    IOC Vice President John Coates delivers a speech during the closing plenary session of the IOC Debriefing of the Olympic Games Rio 2016, in Tokyo, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. The three-day IOC debriefing ends Wednesday to share knowledge and experiences between the Rio Olympic Games organizers and future host cities, including Tokyo which will host the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    TOKYO (AP) — A top IOC official renewed his demand Thursday that Japanese organizers further reduce their $18 billion budget ceiling for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, saying the figure could scare off cities considering bids for future games.

  • Turkish weightlifter Ozkan loses Olympic doping appeal

    LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Turkish weightlifter Sibel Ozkan has lost an appeal against a doping sanction which cost her a silver medal from the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

  • Preparations set for Thai prince to succeed to throne

    In this May 9, 2016, file photo, Thailand's Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn presides over the royal plowing ceremony in Bangkok. Thailand has a new king, with the country's Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn  formally taking the throne to succeed his much-revered late father, who reigned for 70 years. The new monarch, who received the title "His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun," assumed his new position Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016, according to an announcement broadcast on all TV channels.  (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit, File)

    BANGKOK (AP) — Thailand has a new king, with the country’s crown prince formally taking the throne to succeed his much-revered late father, who reigned for 70 years.

  • AP Explains: What’s behind persecution of Myanmar’s Rohingya

    In this June 24 2014, file photo, Rohingya children gather at the Dar Paing camp for Muslim refugees, north of Sittwe, western Rakhine state, Myanmar. Abdul Razak Ali Artan, the Somali-born student who carried out a car-and-knife attack at Ohio State University on Monday, reported railed on his Facebook account against U.S. interference in countries with Muslim communities. But he specifically protested the killing of Muslims in Myanmar _ also known as Burma _ where the Rohingya ethnic minority faces discrimination and occasional violence from the Buddhist majority and the army and bureaucracy. The Rohingya draw occasional international attention when the violence against them becomes too large to ignore, or when they seek foreign shores as boatpeople in great numbers, but their plight is generally ignored. (AP Photo/ Gemunu Amarasinghe, File)

    BANGKOK (AP) — Abdul Razak Ali Artan, the Somali-born student accused of carrying out a car-and-knife attack at Ohio State University this week, reportedly protested on his Facebook page about the killing of minority Muslims in Myanmar. Muslim Rohingya face discrimination and violence from the Buddhist majority in the country, also called Burma. Their plight generally goes unnoticed by the world at large, even though some rights activists say their persecution amounts to ethnic cleansing. Here are several things to know about the group:

  • Dambaugh, Thanapolboonyaras lead LPGA Tour Q-school

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — University of South Carolina senior Katelyn Dambaugh and Thailand’s Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras each shot 5-under 67 on Wednesday to share the first-round lead in the LPGA Qualifying Tournament.

  • UN further tightens North Korea sanctions

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council voted Wednesday to further tighten sanctions on North Korea following months of diplomatic wrangling over how best to respond to North Korea’s latest nuclear test in September and their repeated defiance of international sanctions and diplomatic pressure.

  • Major indexes set records as energy companies surge

    This July 15, 2013, file photo, shows the New York Stock Exchange. Oil prices surged Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, on expectations of a production cut from the OPEC cartel of producers. Shares in oil companies rose in the slipstream of higher oil prices, helping indexes around the world to post solid gains. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks moved mostly lower Wednesday as gains in blue-chip energy companies and banks were not enough to make up for losses in the broader market.

  • Tokyo organizers promise cost-cutting for 2020 Olympics

    Carlos Nuzman, president of the Rio 2016 Organizing Committee, delivers speech during a press conference of the closing plenary session of the IOC Debriefing of the Olympic Games Rio 2016, in Tokyo, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016. The three-day IOC debriefing ends Wednesday to share knowledge and experiences between the Rio Olympic Games organizers and future host cities, including Tokyo which will host the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    TOKYO (AP) — Hoping to avoid last-minute financial pressures, Japanese officials said Wednesday they are determined to keep total costs of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics Games below 2 trillion yen ($18 billion) after a three-day debriefing from organizers of the Rio de Janeiro Games.

  • Analysis: S. Korea leader again buys time, but failure looms

    A worker prepares to deliver newspapers reporting on South Korean President Park Geun-hye's public announcement at a distrobution station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. South Korean President Park Geun-hye said Tuesday that she'll resign — if parliament arranges the technical details — in her latest attempt to fend off impeachment efforts and massive street protests amid prosecution claims that a corrupt confidante wielded government power from the shadows. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — She pulled off a deft bit of political maneuvering, probably born of desperation. Now South Korea’s president has a sliver of breathing space as impeachment closes in and millions throng the streets to clamor for her to just go away.

  • Indonesia protests awaken fears for minority Chinese

    In this Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 photo, Indonesian ethnic Chinese Jhony Tan prays at his store at the Chinatown in Jakarta, Indonesia.  The capital of Muslim-majority Indonesia is on edge ahead of what is expected to be a second massive protest on Friday by conservative Muslims against its Christian governor and no group more so than its Chinese minority.  They have reason to be concerned. The movement against the governor, who is being prosecuted for allegedly insulting the Quran, has overflowed with racial slurs against his Chinese ancestry and has awakened painful memories of deadly anti-Chinese riots in 1998. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — The capital of Muslim-majority Indonesia is on edge ahead of what is expected to be a second massive protest by conservative Muslims against its Christian governor and no group more so than its Chinese minority.