• In this Aug. 18, 2014, file photo, protesters walk through the streets after a standoff with police in Ferguson, Mo. A year ago, most Americans had never heard of the St. Louis suburb called Ferguson. But after a white police officer fatally shot a black 18-year-old in the street, the name of the middle-class community quickly became known around the world. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

    Year later, AP reporter recalls origins of Ferguson movement

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — EDITOR’S NOTE — A year ago, most Americans had never heard of the St. Louis suburb called Ferguson. But after a white police officer fatally shot a black 18-year-old in the street, the name of the middle-class community became virtually a household word. From the first hours after Michael Brown’s death, Associated Press reporter Jim Salter watched as a neighborhood protest launched a national movement. What follows is an excerpt of the introduction to “Deadly Force: Fatal Confrontations with Police,” an upcoming book published by The Associated Press (www.ap.org/books ).

    Updated: 5:31 am

  • Cornell William Brooks, NAACP president, holds the hand of Rachel Quarterman, 7, while leading the "America's Journey for Justice March" organized by the NAACP on Saturday, Aug. 1, 2015, in Selma, Ala. The 860 mile relay march is planned to go from Selma to Washington D.C. over the course of 40 days. (Albert Cesare/Montgomery Advertiser via AP)

    NAACP’s ‘Journey for Justice’ protest march begins in Selma

    SELMA, Ala. (AP) — Protest marches have been part of Selma’s civil rights fabric since 1965, but an 860-mile trek to Washington had a minister leaning on the Bible for heavenly support Saturday.