• What you need to know today about the virus outbreak

    America’s coronavirus infections have surged to the most in the world, reaching 100,000 cases Friday with New York still the worst hit in the country. Troubling new outbreaks are bubbling in other cities including Chicago, Detroit and New Orleans, which is rushing to build a makeshift hospital in its convention center.

  • NOT REAL NEWS: Debunking yet more false coronavirus content

    A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:

  • For nursing homes, symptoms aren’t enough to tell who’s sick

    SEATTLE (AP) — An investigation at a Seattle-area nursing home concluded that symptoms aren’t enough to identify who is infected once the coronavirus enters a long-term care facility.

  • No games, big losses: Money crisis faces US Olympic sports

    DENVER (AP) — The postponement of the Tokyo Games has catapulted the sports organizations that make up the backbone of the U.S. Olympic team into crisis.

  • A few miles away yet worlds apart, 2 families wait out virus

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One week in isolation. Two families. Only a few miles away, yet a world apart.

  • Water shutoffs in sharp focus amid coronavirus outbreak

    DETROIT (AP) —

  • Texas man jailed for online threats against Nancy Pelosi

    WICHITA FALLS, Texas (AP) — A Texas man faces federal charges after he made online posts threatening Democrats, including U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, authorities said.

  • A defiant Maduro threatens ‘cowboy’ Trump after drug charge

    MIAMI (AP) — Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro stood defiant in the face of a $15 million bounty by the U.S. to face drug trafficking charges, calling Donald Trump a “racist cowboy” and warning that he is ready to fight by whatever means necessary should the U.S. and neighboring Colombia dare to invade.

  • On NYC’s front lines, health workers worry they will be next

    NEW YORK (AP) — A nurse died from coronavirus after working nonstop for weeks at a hospital where staffers frustrated with dwindling supplies posed in gowns made of trash bags. An emergency room doctor fears he had the virus long before getting too sick to work. Another nurse worries the lone mask she’s issued each day won’t be enough to protect her from an unending tide of hacking, feverish patients.

  • A New York doctor’s story: ‘Too many people are dying alone’

    NEW YORK (AP) — As an emergency medicine physician in New York City, Dr. Kamini Doobay has always known that death is part of the territory when trying to care for the city’s sickest.