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CarlsbadMeeting01

Above, Joe Franco, district manager for the Department of Energy, speaks to Southeast New Mexico residents Monday at a town hall meeting in Carlsbad. At left, Cameron Murphy, a 41-year-old filmmaker from Carlsbad, questions CEMRC Director Russell Hardy about the potential danger of airborne radiation from the WIPP site. Brandon Messick - Daily Press

Above, Joe Franco, district manager for the Department of Energy, speaks to Southeast New Mexico residents Monday at a town hall meeting in Carlsbad. At top, Cameron Murphy, a 41-year-old filmmaker from Carlsbad, questions CEMRC Director Russell Hardy about the potential danger of airborne radiation from the WIPP site.
Brandon Messick – Daily Press

By BRANDON MESSICK

Daily Press Staff Writer

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 26 miles outside of Carlsbad, remains closed as experts from the Department of Energy plan to analyze and contain the source of radiation that was released into the facility on Feb. 14.

 

Carlsbad Mayor Dale Janway organized a town hall meeting Monday to discuss the incident, with officials available to answer questions from concerned Eddy County citizens. … For the rest of the story, subscribe in print and on the web.