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(Daily Press 1978 File Photo)

Looking back 40, 30 and 20 years ago, the following are excerpts from the Artesia Daily Press from Nov. 12-18.

40 years ago
Nov. 12-18, 1978

Pumpkin Power prevailed in Bulldog Bowl Friday night, as the Artesia Bulldogs tallied 36 first-half points, then sat back and engaged in a defensive battle with the Lovington Wildcats before emerging victorious with a 39-12 whipping of the ‘Cats. The win gave the ‘Dogs the 4-AAA district title for the fifth year in a row, cleared the air, and set the stage for a pre-playoff contest with Kirtland Central next week in Artesia.

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Wilma Connor, a member of the Artesia High School class of 1929, was awarded a plaque for being the oldest graduate attending Friday night’s Homecoming game against Lovington, while Edwin Moore, class of 1970, of Leggett, Calif., was honored for being the graduate to travel the farthest distance to attend the game. Both were presented plaques by Tracy Brown, student council president. Priscilla Lovis was crowned 1978 Homecoming Queen.

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As reported in the Pinon News: Thursday of last week, Mrs. Bud Wilburn of Artesia came to the high mountain area to get pictures of the array of colors displayed by the maple, aspen, and oak tree leaves, but found she was too late as they had all lost their leaves, but the oaks and they had turned brown. She became lost and came to the Basil Holcomb ranch about eight miles north of Pinon. She stopped there as she was rather scared. She could get no one on her CB radio and was not familiar with the roads. When she learned where she was, she planned to go back and return to Artesia by Mayhill. Basil knew her husband and his parents as they had lived several years in Alamogordo. Ethel and John Wilburn operated a big hotel in downtown Alamogordo, and Bud was football coach in the Alamogordo school system several years. Mrs. Wilburn reported Bud was now a teacher in Artesia.

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Artesia’s defending Class 3A state champ girls’ volleyball team goes after another state title when they take on District 2-AAA runner-up Taos Friday at the Roswell High School gym, and Bulldog Coach Linda Ferguson admits she wants this one more than she wanted last year’s. “This state tournament just means more to me personally, and I’m sure it means more to the girls,” she said. “I know there might be some feeling around the state that last year’s win was a fluke of sorts, and that the only way a team can prove that it is good is to win a second state championship as soon after the first one as possible.” Added to this is the fact that, for once, Coach Ferguson will be taking girls to state who have been totally involved in her volleyball program in this, her second year at the helm of Artesia volleyball.

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With a collective sigh of relief and a splash of dramatics, the North Eddy County United Way fund drive announced the close of the drive with a goal not only being met but exceeded. C. Neal Johnson, president of the drive, announced at a luncheon meeting at the Town House Cafeteria Thursday the campaign had collected $61,860, about $300 over the goal of $61,546, with all money still not gathered.

30 years ago
Nov. 12-18, 1988

The Lake Arthur Panthers won the 1988 Six-Man Football State championship Saturday by beating the Mountainair Mustangs 70-22 in Lake Arthur. The state title was the second straight for the Panthers, who finished the season with a 9-1 record. The Mustangs ended up 8-1. The game was called by the 45-point rule with 1:37 remaining in the third quarter.

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“I guess one of my ancestors just got lazy and decided to drop the ‘e,’” says Jim Moor, explaining why his last name doesn’t have an “e” on the end of it like most of the Moores you’ve bumped into. The 28-year-old Moor is a triad: He grew up in Ohio, lives in Artesia, and works in Lake Arthur. Moor is the head coach of the extremely successful Panther six-man football team. Moor has coached the Panthers for the past four seasons. His 1985 team went 5-2 before being eliminated by Vaughn, while his 1986 team went 5-3 and didn’t qualify for the playoffs. But it’s been all gravy the past two seasons, as Lake Arthur has gone 9-1 each year and won back-to-back state titles.

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Artesia-area motorcyclists will take to the streets for a good cause Saturday, Dec. 10, in the inaugural Artesia Toy Run Motorcycle Parade. The event is designed to increase participation in the annual Oscar Reyes Memorial Toy Drive conducted by the National Guard.

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As reported in the Pinon News: Mrs. Margaret Merritt and Mrs. Oza Holcomb went to Alamogordo Thursday to attend election school. They enjoyed it as they have been attending the schools for many years and Thursday was the first time they had teaching on how to operate the voting machines. Andy Wynham was a good teacher for that, as well as other instructions on the other things needed to be known in elections. Mrs. Holcomb learned to operate the voting machine with the help of Bennie Fleming and reading with him the instructions for operating them.

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Taylor Stephenson, 1989 United Way campaign chairman, has announced a total of $100,236 in pledges collected during the fall campaign of the North Eddy County United Fund.

20 years ago
Nov. 12-18, 1998

The skies over Artesia should be dotted with the colors of hot air balloons Saturday and Sunday morning, as the Bulldog Balloon Rally gets underway. The Greater Artesia Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring the annual event, which is expected to feature 30 balloons.

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Jennifer Taylor, of Artesia, was one of 16 West Texas A&M University students inducted into the Iota Theta chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the education honor society. Members of Kappa Delta Pi must be junior or senior education majors with an overall grade point average of 3.25. Taylor is a senior elementary education math major.

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As reported in the Pinon News: Another hunting season is partly gone. The old timers here have seen several of them. Some of them were fun, some a lot of trouble, and some a lot of hard work and sorrow. Mrs. Oza Holcomb was in her garden and a few feet from the house and there were shots very near her. It scared her so much it seemed she could not move, but when she could she looked everywhere trying to see what, or where, but she could not see a person anywhere. She went back in the house and stayed the rest of the day and kept watching, but never did see anyone. She wondered if she did not have several more gray hairs on her head but could not be sure about that.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Looking Back was compiled by Daily Press Community Living Editor Teresa Lemon.)