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Since their days behind the wheel of student-driver vehicles, American motorists have been taught that speed kills. Yet drivers in the U.S. routinely exceed posted speed limits.

To find out which states take the hardest line on dangerous driving behavior, personal-finance website WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of penalties for speeding and reckless driving in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Data sets ranged from which speeds are automatically considered reckless to how many speeding tickets it takes to earn an automatic license suspension.

New Mexico tied for third with Arizona amongst the toughest states on dangerous driving, according to the following ratings:

• 13th in speeding automatically considered reckless driving.
• 9th in average increase in cost of insurance after one speeding ticket.
• 4th in how much speeding ticket points count toward a suspension.
• 3rd in minimum jail time for a first reckless offense.
• 4th in minimum jail time for a second reckless offense.
• 12th in maximum fines.

Topping the “strict” list were Delaware and Colorado. The states rated most lenient were Texas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, New Jersey and Nebraska.