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Children from Learning Ladder Early Childhood Education Center explore an old typewriter at the local museum. (Nancy Dunn – For the Daily Press)

Most of us have gotten used to adjusting to new technology in our lifetimes — and let’s face it, the newest gadgetry is a lot of fun to tinker with!

But the earlier innovations in communications and entertainment that led up to today’s devices can be fascinating, too, especially to those of us who never had the chance to experience them in the first place. (Remember rotary-dial telephones?)

“Everything Old is New Again in Technology,” on display now through Aug. 31 at the Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center, gives everyone the chance to explore older technology in a hands-on exhibit that allows visitors the chance to send — and decode — a Morse code telegraph message, make telephone switchboard connections, and dial a real rotary telephone!

Visitors can also experiment with adding and subtracting on an early calculator, typing a message on a real typewriter, and looking at 3D images in an early stereoscope. Also on display are several early records, a teletype machine, and an early Videodisc player.

“Everything Old is New Again in Technology” is open during regular museum hours, 9 a.m. – noon and 1-5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1-5 p.m. Saturdays. After-hours tours are available by appointment, and large groups are asked to call in advance, 575-748-2390.

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    Two boys decode a Morse code telegraph message. (Nancy Dunn - For the Daily Press)

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    A child experiments with a telephone switchboard. (Nancy Dunn - For the Daily Press)

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    Children use old adding machines. (Nancy Dunn - For the Daily Press)

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    A boy looks through a stereoscope (an early 3D viewer). (Nancy Dunn - For the Daily Press)

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    A boy phones a friend on a rotary telephone. (Nancy Dunn - For the Daily Press)