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4-3-AprilFoolsLogoThis recipe originally ran in the Artesia Advocate on Feb. 4, 1905, and seems to have been meant to be taken seriously! Besides sounding absolutely vile (and probably poisonous), the final line about its popularity in France had the museum staff laughing.

We included it in our “Artesia’s Most Wanted: Pioneer Recipes 1900-1960” along with recipes for Fireless Cooking For Dogs, How To Cook A Husband, and Recipe For Happiness, just for fun, and more than 200 actual edible recipes. Copies are still available at the Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center or B&B Newsstand. (Please note that we DO NOT recommend actually trying this recipe!)

Sawdust Liqueur

Two tons of sawdust are boiled with sulphuric acid for three hours, the liquid matter then extracted by pressure, neutralized, left for eighteen hours to cool and clarify, and then fermented for four or five days. The resulting alcohol is afterward distilled and rectified, but a yield of about nine and one-half quarts of spirit to every hundred-weight of sawdust is obtained. Quantities of this are consumed in France.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: The above recipe is courtesy Nancy Dunn, Artesia Historical Museum and Art Center manager.)