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Looking back 40, 30 and 20 years ago, the following are excerpts from the Artesia Daily Press from Oct. 4 – 10.

40 years ago
Oct. 4 – 10, 1975

The fall cotton harvest will call for activation of the county’s various cotton gins during the next few weeks. For the most part, gins have set idle since the last bale was processed late last season. The Artesia Alfalfa Growers Gin, located north of Artesia, was active as early as last week when northern Eddy County produced its first trailer load of cotton in 1975.

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As reported in the Pinon News: A large crowd gathered at the Extension Club building for a farewell party honoring Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Turnbow Tuesday evening of last week. As a going-away gift, they were given a money tree with about $65 on it. The Turnbows left early Wednesday morning, moving to Throeau, where Turnbow will be minister for the Church of Chrust. B.C. Coats of Sacramento, is now the minister for the church here.

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Groundbreaking ceremonies were held Thursday evening at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 2207 W. Main. Church president Allen Young and Artesia Mayor Ernest Thompson completed the ceremony by lifting the first spade of ground and marking the beginning of the expansion which will cost approximately $64,000 to build and equip. Work on the new church will be completed in January of 1976, and the mortgage-free building will be dedicated at that time.

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After several months of separation and waiting for the approval of state officials, Artesia Christian College opened to the public Tuesday night. Approximately 50 people from Artesia, Roswell and Lovington were on hand to participate in the college’s “Open Class Night,” a free night of classes offered to acquaint prospective students with the college faculty and the classes offered.

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Artesia Square Dance Club members celebrated the first anniversary of the club at the Elks Club. The eight original members of the group and the club’s caller and his wife joined in on the festivities.

30 years ago
Oct. 4 – 10, 1985

Artesia school superintendent Taylor Stephenson helped the Artesia Band Boosters paint the circle for the annual fundraising cakewalk to be conducted Saturday. Participants will march to music of the Park Junior High and Artesia High School bands as they vie for homemade cakes.

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Artesia High School varsity football coach T.W. Harvey may or may not believe in things like Fumble Quotas, but if he does, then his team Friday night took a large step toward fulfilling its 1985 allotment. Still, Harvey’s troops managed to kick in some hefty running by Jay Worden and Trent Boneau and a sparkling kickoff return by Ricky Aguilar to hold off the Fabens Wildcats 20-14 at Bulldog Bowl.

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Artesia Mayor Ernest Thompson has proclaimed today through Saturday as “National 4-H Week” in the city. This year’s theme is “4-H for Youth of America.” More than 4.5 million members develop life skills by participation in the program, assisted by over 600,000 volunteer leaders, the proclamation reads.

20 years ago
Oct. 4 – 10, 1995

Two new teachers, Gena Vest and Joley Deerman, have joined the staff at Hermosa Elementary School. Hermosa Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Gena Vest is a two-year resident of Artesia, and was born and grew up in Artesia. Hermosa Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Joley Deerman is a 23-year resident of Artesia, and graduated Artesia High School in 1990.

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Making up Artesia High School’s 1995 Homecoming Court are sophomore attendant Joyce Smith, junior attendant Kendra Lewellen, maid of honor Kathy Tutak, senior honor Kathy Tutak, senior princesses Anna Sims and Robin Worthington, and queen Michelle Balencia. The court was presented to the student body at an assembly this afternoon and will be presented to the public at halftime of Saturday’s Artesia-Bloomfield football game.

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The North Eddy County United Way fund drive to raise its yearly goal of $130,000 is underway with the final two months of the 1996 campaign closing in. In North Eddy County, the United Way has determined that 34 percent of monies raised by the organization go toward basic needs of residents in distress – food, clothing and shelter.

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On this day in 1995, Artesians could purchase a pair of brand new cowboy boots for $110 at Bennie’s Western Wear, and a 15-pound bag of potatoes was $1.39 at Batie’s Food.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Looking Back is compiled each week by Daily Press Community Living Editor Teresa Lemon.)