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TO THE EDITOR:

I am writing in response to the letter from Cindy Price regarding the National MS Society and their stand on stem cell transplants as a treatment for multiple sclerosis.

With some research you will find out that the MS Society has supported 70 different projects in this field over the past 10 years and are currently supporting 15 active projects. They also refer to stem cell transplants, including HSCT, as a promising treatment for MS. The National MS Society currently is funding some $90 million dollars in MS research. Asking people to not contribute to this organization is in my opinion counter productive.

I have MS and have benefited from the Society’s wealth of information on medications, life style improvements, support group and research grants. The MS Society is not the only source of good information. A simple internet search will overwhelm you with sources. Like any disease there are also unscrupulous people/ organizations out there trying to take advantage of those suffering from this disease by offering questionable treatments.

We’re getting closer to a cure thanks to the research that is taking place. Since my diagnosis 8 years ago the number of medications aimed directly at MS has doubled. That’s progress! Here is the link to the MS Society’s stem cell information: http://www.nationalmssociety.org/Research/Research-We-Fund/Restoring-Whats- Been-Lost/Repairing-Damaged-Tissues/Stem-Cells-in-MS.

Per Landeck